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A Health Podyssey

A Health Podyssey

A Health Podyssey goes beyond the pages of Health Affairs to tell stories behind the research and share policy implications.

Latest From Series

Lowering Medicare eligibility may improve cancer outcomes

"I think we need to step back first before we even ask the policy question and ask this simple question, is it okay in the United States to die of cancer simply because you don't have health insurance?" - Dr. Gerard SilvestriCancer is a leading cause of death in the United States. Although there have been declines in cancer deaths in recent years, improvements have not been equally distributed across the population.The risk of cancer increases with age and nearly a quarter of all new cancers diagnosed each year in the US occur among those aged 55 to 64 years old. At age 65, most Americans gain Medicare coverage, creating a ready comparison of cancer outcomes between those just below age 65 — who may have private insurance, Medicaid, or are uninsured — and those above 65 who are on Medicare.The relationship between insurance coverage and cancer outcomes is the subject of this episode of A Health Podyssey.  Dr. Gerard Silvestri, a professor of thoracic oncology at the Medical University of South Carolina, joins the program to discuss a paper he and co-authors published in the May 2021 issue of Health Affairs wherein they found significantly worse survival rates for uninsured patients ages 60 to 64 in comparison to Medicare beneficiaries.Listen to Alan Weil interview Gerard Silvestri on cancer outcomes among Medicare beneficiaries and their younger, uninsured counterparts.Subscribe: RSS | Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Google Podcasts
May 18, 2021

Breaking down how pharmacy deserts and access relate to health equity

Many think of pharmacies primarily as places to get prescription medications, but pharmacists are highly trained clinicals who offer other important health care services. Pharmacies are a valuable health care resource, and access to pharmacies may be an overlooked contributor to health inequities. Individuals who live in pharmacy deserts aren't able to easily obtain prescription medications or essential health care services. While the overall number of pharmacies in the US has increased gradually in recent years, research shows inequitable distribution of pharmacy and pharmacy closures.  On today's episode of A Health Podyssey, Jenny Guadamuz from the University of Southern California School of Pharmacy joins Health Affairs Editor-in-Chief Alan Weil to discuss her research published in the May 2021 edition of Health Affairs. Guadamuz and colleagues investigated the accessibility of pharmacies by neighborhood racial and ethnic composition in large US cities from 2007 to 2015. They found fewer pharmacies and more pharmacy closures located in predominantly black and Hispanic/Latino neighborhoods when compared with other neighborhoods. Listen to Health Affairs Editor-in-Chief Alan Weil interview Jenny Guadamuz discuss this foundational research on pharmacy access and how policies can encourage pharmacies to operate in pharmacy deserts.Subscribe: RSS | Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Google Podcasts
May 11, 2021

Understanding private equity investment in hospitals

Listen to Health Affairs Editor-in-Chief Alan Weil interview Dr. Anaeze Offodile from the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center on the role of private equity investments in health care.
May 4, 2021

Should social risks factor into health care quality measures?

Listen to Health Affairs Editor-in-Chief Alan Weil interview David Nerenz from the Henry Ford Health System about social risk factors and their controversial inclusion as a measure of health care quality.
April 27, 2021

ACA closed health coverage gaps for pregnant women. There’s still a long way to go

Listen to Editor-in-Chief Alan Weil interview Dr. Emily Johnston from the Health Policy Center at the Urban Institute. Johnston shares insights from her latest research on women’s loss of Medicaid in the weeks before or after pregnancy.
April 20, 2021

Urgent care centers cost more than you think

Listen to Health Affairs Editor-in-Chief Alan Weil interview University of Pennsylvania's Ari Friedman on his research that shows urgent care costs increased net health care spending.
April 13, 2021

A Health Podyssey

Each week, Health Affairs Editor-in-Chief Alan Weil brings you in-depth conversations with leading researchers and influencers shaping the big ideas in health policy and the health care industry.

A Health Podyssey goes beyond the pages of Health Affairs to tell stories behind the research and share policy implications. Learn how academics and economists frame their research questions and journey to the intersection of health, health care, and policy. Health policy nerds rejoice! This podcast is for you.
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Host

Alan Weil

Alan Weil

Alan Weil is the Editor-in-Chief of Health Affairs, the leading health policy journal.

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