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143: Dr. Akilah Cadet, DEIB Specialist Living with Rare Heart Disease & hEDS

Uninvisible Pod

143: Dr. Akilah Cadet, DEIB Specialist Living with Rare Heart Disease & hEDS

Dr. Akilah Cadet is the Founder and CEO of Change Cadet consulting firm, which offers a broad array of anti-racism and diversity services including strategic planning, crisis rebuilding, advising, executive coaching, and facilitation....
January 5, 2022

143: Dr. Akilah Cadet, DEIB Specialist Living with Rare Heart Disease & hEDS

Dr. Akilah Cadet is the Founder and CEO of Change Cadet consulting firm, which offers a broad array of anti-racism and diversity services including strategic planning, crisis rebuilding, advising, executive coaching, and facilitation. Cadet (her last name) is a French term that means soldier. As it’s often an uphill battle for BIPOC, women, and historically excluded communities to achieve success and equity in the workplace, Change Cadet prepares soldiers of change to overcome these continuous battles so individuals and companies can thrive. Akilah has 15+ years of experience working in various organizations, with both private and public sector companies. She literally has all the degrees (Bachelor of Science in Health Education in Community Based Public Health, a Master of Public Health, and a Doctorate of Health Sciences in Leadership and Organizational Behavior), lives in Oakland, CA, has a rare heart condition, and is a proud Beyoncé advocate…and has just been diagnosed with hypermobile Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome (hEDS). And on top of all that, she’s the host of the Change Cadet Podcast!

Tune in as Dr. Cadet shares:

  • how her early symptoms first manifested
  • the truth about accurate diagnosis: “in order to be diagnosed, you have to be misdiagnosed”
  • how she was diagnosed with coronary artery spasms, or Prinzmetal’s angina; as well as inappropriate sinus tachycardia, pre-atrial contractions (irregular heartbeat), and orthostatic hypertension
  • how she faced her own mortality during the process of being diagnosed
  • what her long-term care looks like with regard to heart health: ER visits and the risk of heart attack
  • the criteria she holds her care providers to
  • why she is still waiting for genetic testing to determine her hEDS type
  • how she manages her symptoms day-to-day — and how so much of that management involves clear communication
  • what true energy management looks like for her
  • why the “ER is nothing but trauma for [her]” — and why healthcare in America is such a mess
  • a conversation about the concepts of intersectionality and inspiration in chronic illness and disability identities
  • her advice for Spoonies and their loved ones

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