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Mayo Clinic Talks

Mayo Clinic Talks

Stay on top of your practice with podcasts from colleagues at Mayo Clinic.

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Utilizing Artificial Intelligence to Evaluate Dizziness

Guest: Devin L. McCaslin, Ph.D. Host: Darryl S. Chutka, M.D. (@ChutkaMD) Being dizzy means different things to different patients and most patients find dizziness difficult to describe. Providers find it difficult to evaluate patients with dizziness and also which specialties can be asked for help in managing the dizzy patient. Dr. Devin McCaslin is the Director of the Vestibular and Balance Laboratory at the Mayo Clinic and an expert in evaluating the dizzy patient. He will discuss such topics as the role of vestibular balance laboratory testing in assessing patients, the most common findings from these evaluations, the multi-disciplinary approach to evaluating patients with dizziness, and how artificial intelligence is being used in the evaluation of a patient complaining of dizziness. Specific Topics Discussed: The multi-disciplinary approach to evaluating patients complaining of dizziness. Most common findings in the evaluation of a patient with dizziness. The role of vestibular balance laboratory testing in assessing patients who are candidates for these tests. How artificial intelligence is being used in the evaluation of patients with dizziness. Connect with the Mayo Clinic’s School of Continuous Professional Development online at https://ce.mayo.edu/ or on Twitter @MayoMedEd.
April 20, 2021

Mayo Clinic Q&A: Vacation Travel, Vaccines for Teens and More COVID-19 News

This episode is shared from Mayo Clinic Q&A and was recorded in April, 2021 To claim credit visit: https://ce.mayo.edu/covid19podcast  Guest:  Gregory A. Poland, M.D. (@drgregpoland)  Host: Halena M. Gazelka, M.D. (@hmgazelkamd)    If you're fully vaccinated for COVID-19 you can travel domestically and where travel is allowed internationally, according to new interim travel guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Even with those recommendations the CDC continues to recommend not traveling unless it is essential. Regardless, the CDC strongly recommends people continue to wear a face mask, practice social distancing and sanitize their hands. Meanwhile, COVID-19 vaccine research is continuing in teenagers. "The early data show equal safety in young people aged 12 to 16," says Dr. Gregory Poland, an infectious diseases expert and head of Mayo Clinic's Vaccine Research Group. "I think this is going to imply that, somewhere between this fall and Christmas, we're going to be able to offer the (COVID-19) vaccine to every age group." In this Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Poland answers a number of listener questions, including how long the COVID-19 vaccines are predicted to last and if the current transmission research still supports wiping down household items. Dr. Poland also explains why someone who has had COVID-19 should still get a COVID-19 vaccine. AskMayoExpert COVID-19 Resources: https://askmayoexpert.mayoclinic.org/navigator/COVID-19 Connect with the Mayo Clinic’s School of Continuous Professional Development online at https://ce.mayo.edu/ or on Twitter @MayoMedEd.
April 19, 2021

This Podcast Will Make Your Head Spin

Guest: Scott D. Eggers, M.D. (@sdze) Host: Darryl S. Chutka, M.D. (@ChutkaMD)  The complaint of dizziness is a common symptom our patients experience. It has a variety of causes; fortunately, most of them are benign. Despite the fact we frequently see patients with this medical concern, we still struggle evaluating them. Part of the difficulty is that dizziness means different things to different people and the cause of dizziness can be caused by disorders in one of several organ systems. To help us evaluate dizziness, Dr. Scott Eggers, a neurologist at the Mayo Clinic, reviews why dizziness is so difficult to evaluate and how we should evaluate a patient who complains of dizziness. We also explore the most common causes of dizziness including benign positional vertigo and vestibular neuritis. Finally, Dr. Eggers reviews symptoms that are suspicious for an ominous cause of dizziness. Specific topics discussed: Why dizziness is difficult to evaluate How to evaluate the complaint of dizziness Most common causes of dizziness Dizziness symptoms which are ominous for serious disease Description of benign positional vertigo Description of vestibular neuritis Description of vestibular migraines Connect with the Mayo Clinic’s School of Continuous Professional Development online at https://ce.mayo.edu/ or on Twitter @MayoMedEd.
April 13, 2021

COVID-19 Miniseries Episode 69: Post-Acute COVID-19 and Central Sensitization

Central sensitization (CS) describes pathophysiologic changes in the central nervous system, including alterations in neurochemistry, CNS receptors, endogenous opioid system hyperactivity, cytokine and HPA axis dysregulation, and sympathetic hyperactivity. Collectively, these changes result in amplification of pain and sensory signals, leading to widespread pain, fatigue and other sensory sensitivities. Fibromyalgia and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome are established diagnoses/manifestations of central sensitization. In the era of the COVID-19 pandemic, we continue to learn about Post-Acute COVID-19 Syndrome, a manifestation of central sensitization similar to other post-infectious forms of CS, which underlies the persistent symptoms that many people experience after initial recovery from COVID-19. Elizabeth C. Wight, M.D. joins us to talk about Mayo Clinic’s treatment approach to central sensitization, which is rooted in empowering patients with education and a framework for a self-management program. This includes stress management, moderation, positive thinking, decreasing focus on symptoms, sleep hygiene, and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy among others. Additional resources: Post-COVID Recovery on Mayo Clinic Connect: https://connect.mayoclinic.org/page/post-covid-recovery/ Mayo Clinic’s “A Systematic Approach to Medically Unexplained Symptoms 2021” course can be found at https://ce.mayo.edu/internal-medicine/content/systematic-approach-medically-unexplained-symptoms-2021#group-tabs-node-course-default1 Clauw DJ. Fibromyalgia: A clinical review. JAMA. 2014;311(15):1547-1555. doi:1001/jama.2014.3266 Clauw DJ. Fibromyalgia and related conditions. Mayo Clin Proc. 2015 May;90(5):680-92. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.mayocp.2015.03.014 Harte, SE, Harris, RE, Clauw, DJ. The neurobiology of central sensitization. J Appl Behav Res. 2018; 23(2): e12137. https://doi.org/10.1111/jabr.12137 Connect with the Mayo Clinic’s School of Continuous Professional Development online at https://ce.mayo.edu/ or on Twitter @MayoMedEd.
April 6, 2021

Your Patient Has a Thyroid Nodule – What Now?

Guest: Jan L. Kasperbauer, M.D. Host: Darryl S. Chutka, M.D. (@ChutkaMD) Thyroid nodules are commonly found in patients by primary care providers, either by physical exam or incidentally by a variety of imaging studies. Fortunately, the vast majority of thyroid nodules are benign, however as primary care providers we need to be comfortable in evaluating them to rule out the possibility that they represent a thyroid cancer. Joining us is Dr. Jan Kasperbauer, an otolaryngologist at the Mayo Clinic. We discuss risk factors for thyroid cancer, how a primary care provider should evaluate and manage patients with thyroid nodules, various types of thyroid cancer, and treatment options as well as the recommended follow-up for patients with thyroid cancer. Specific topics discussed: Risk factors for thyroid cancer Detecting thyroid cancers How primary care provider should evaluate and manage patients with thyroid nodules Review of the various types of thyroid cancer Treatment options for thyroid cancer Recommendations for primary care providers in following patients with treated thyroid cancer Additional resources: Classification for risk stratification and follow up recommendations: Grant, EG, et al. Thyroid ultrasound reporting lexicon: white paper of the ACR thyroid imaging, reporting and data system (TIRADS) committee. J Am Coll Radiol. 2015 Dec; 12(12): 1272-1279. doi: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jacr.2015.07.011 Connect with the Mayo Clinic’s School of Continuous Professional Development online at https://ce.mayo.edu/ or on Twitter @MayoMedEd.
March 30, 2021

Mayo Clinic Q&A: Viruses Cannot Mutate If They Cannot Replicate

This episode is shared from Mayo Clinic Q&A and was recorded in March, 2021 Guest:  Gregory A. Poland, M.D. (@drgregpoland)  Host: Halena M. Gazelka, M.D. (@hmgazelkamd)  The COVID-19 virus mutates and replicates when people let down their guard and don't follow safety protocols, such as practicing social distancing and wearing a mask.  "I think most of us expect a major surge because of spring break travel and the relaxation of restrictions," says Dr. Gregory Poland, an infectious diseases expert and head of Mayo Clinic's Vaccine Research Group. "And the sort of COVID fatigue that all of us feel, in one way or another." In this Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Poland addresses the potential of a fourth COVID-19 surge, new information regarding the COVID-19 vaccines for pregnant women and he discusses research for next generation vaccines for COVID-19 variants. AskMayoExpert COVID-19 Resources: https://askmayoexpert.mayoclinic.org/navigator/COVID-19 Connect with the Mayo Clinic’s School of Continuous Professional Development online at https://ce.mayo.edu/ or on Twitter @MayoMedEd.
March 26, 2021

Mayo Clinic Talks

Stay on top of your practice with podcasts from colleagues at Mayo Clinic.

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Darryl Chutka, M.D.

Darryl Chutka, M.D.

Internist | Geriatrician | Educator | Host

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