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Mayo Clinic Talks

Mayo Clinic Talks

Stay on top of your practice with podcasts from colleagues at Mayo Clinic.

Latest From Series

What’s That Sound? Maybe It’s Stridor

Guest: Shelagh A. Cofer, M.D. (@ShelaghCoferMD) Host: Darryl S. Chutka, M.D. (@ChutkaMD) Stridor is a musical sound due to disrupted airflow in an individual’s airway. In many instances it’s due to a benign cause but it can also represent a serious problem, possibly even life-threatening. In today’s podcast, we’ll learn about the various causes of stridor and when we need to be concerned that it represents a serious health issue. Our guest for this podcast is Dr. Shelagh Cofer, a pediatric otolaryngology specialist at the Mayo Clinic. We’ll discuss how stridor differs from wheezing, the most common causes of stridor in both children and adults and what symptoms we should be watching for that might suggest a serious cause for stridor. We’ll also cover the evaluation of patients with stridor, which imaging studies may be helpful and when an ENT consultation is warranted. Specific topics: Definition of stridor Difference between stridor, stertor, and wheezing Most common causes of stridor in both children and adults Croup as a form of stridor Important questions we should be asking our patients about stridor to identify those at risk for airway obstruction – including the SPECS-R mnemonic Tests and imaging studies which may be helpful in the evaluation of a patient with stridor Treatments for the more common causes of stridor Additional resources: Zoumalan, R; Maddalozzo, J; Holinger, LD. Etiology of stridor in infants. Ann Otol Rhinol Laryngol. 2007; 116(5):329-334. doi: 10.1.1896.429 https://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.896.429&rep=rep1&type=pdf Connect with the Mayo Clinic’s School of Continuous Professional Development online at https://ce.mayo.edu/ or on Twitter @MayoMedEd.
July 27, 2021

Mayo Clinic Q&A: On the Verge of Predicted COVID-19 Surge with Delta Variant

This episode is shared from Mayo Clinic Q&A and was recorded July, 2021 Guest:  Gregory A. Poland, M.D. (@drgregpoland)  Host: Halena M. Gazelka, M.D. (@hmgazelkamd)    The delta variant is being blamed for hot spots in the U.S. where cases of COVID-19 are on the rise. These hot spots account for most cases in the U.S. They are also the geographical areas that tend to have the lowest vaccination rates.  "It's no surprise that the two go together," says Dr. Gregory Poland, an infectious diseases expert and head of Mayo Clinic's Vaccine Research Group. "This (delta variant) is the bad actor that we predicted it would be," adds Dr. Poland. "Our seven-day average is getting up to 19,000 cases a day in the U.S. We were down to 3,000. So we're starting to see, just as we predicted, a surge as people took masks off and as restrictions were lifted before we had achieved high rates of immunization." In this Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Poland expands on how the highly transmissible delta variant continues to spread. He also talks about the possibility of COVID-19 vaccine boosters, explains how the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System works, and much more as he answers listener questions. AskMayoExpert COVID-19 Resources: https://askmayoexpert.mayoclinic.org/navigator/COVID-19 Connect with the Mayo Clinic’s School of Continuous Professional Development online at https://ce.mayo.edu/ or on Twitter @MayoMedEd.
July 22, 2021

Multidisciplinary Approach to Pelvic Pain

Guest: Isabel C. Green, M.D. Host: Darryl S. Chutka, M.D. (@ChutkaMD) Pelvic pain can be challenging. It can have a variety of presenting symptoms since it can originate from a variety of organ systems. When pelvic pain becomes chronic, it becomes even more challenging. It’s associated with significant direct medical costs as well as indirect costs as it frequently results in work absenteeism. Patients with chronic pelvic pain are often initially evaluated by primary care providers, but referral to specialists is quite common. Due to the variety of symptoms associated with chronic pelvic pain, multiple specialties often are asked to evaluate these patients. This frequently results in patients being passed back and forth between various medical specialties. It therefore becomes important for primary care providers to become comfortable evaluating and managing patients with pelvic pain. Our guest for this podcast is Dr. Isabel Green, a physician from the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the Mayo Clinic. We’ll discuss how to effectively evaluate patients with pelvic pain, “red flag symptoms” to watch for, useful laboratory tests to order, and common imaging studies which can be helpful in establishing a cause for the pain. We’ll also discuss the benefits of a multi-disciplinary approach to pelvic pain. Specific topics: Categorization of pelvic pain Appropriate evaluation of pelvic pain including the clinical history, physical exam, laboratory tests and imaging studies Relationship of chronic pelvic pain with other symptoms such as anxiety, depression, insomnia, and work/relationship issues Chronic pelvic pain representing a form of centralized pain Advantages of a multi-disciplinary approach to evaluating and managing chronic pelvic pain Additional resources: Chronic pelvic pain: ACOG practice bulletin, number 218. Obstet Gynecol. 2020 Mar; 135(3):e98-e109. doi: 1097/AOG.0000000000003716. Connect with the Mayo Clinic’s School of Continuous Professional Development online at https://ce.mayo.edu/ or on Twitter @MayoMedEd.
July 20, 2021

Identifying and Treating Urinary Urge Incontinence

Guest: Brian J. Linder, M.D. (@brianjlinder) Host: Darryl S. Chutka, M.D. (@ChutkaMD) Patients rarely mention urinary incontinence to us as a problem as many assume it’s a normal change of aging. However, it’s a major quality-of-life issue. Many with incontinence are reluctant to go out in public and those who do, usually know the location of all the nearby restrooms. Yet, with proper evaluation and treatment, essentially all patients can be helped, and in many cases, they can be cured. In this podcast, we’ll discuss urgency urinary incontinence, one of the most common forms of incontinence. We’ll cover the questions you should ask your patients to make a diagnosis, what evaluation you should do, and what treatment options are available. Our guest for this topic is Dr. Brian Linder, a urologist at the Mayo Clinic. Specific topics: The various types of urinary incontinence Important questions to ask patients to make a diagnosis Effective use of a voiding diary Physical exam recommendations Helpful laboratory tests When urodynamic studies are indicated Non-pharmacologic treatment options Medications useful in treating urgency incontinence Treatment options for the refractory patient Additional resource: https://www.auanet.org/guidelines/overactive-bladder-(oab)-guideline Connect with the Mayo Clinic’s School of Continuous Professional Development online at https://ce.mayo.edu/ or on Twitter @MayoMedEd.
July 13, 2021

Mayo Clinic Q&A: Summer Travel and People Not in Your Bubble During COVID-19 Pandemic

This episode is shared from Mayo Clinic Q&A and was recorded June, 2021 Guest:  Gregory A. Poland, M.D. (@drgregpoland)  Host: Halena M. Gazelka, M.D. (@hmgazelkamd)    "The reason we have the COVID-19 delta variant, the reason we have the delta plus variant is because of unimmunized people who get infected," says Dr. Gregory Poland, an infectious diseases expert and head of Mayo Clinic's Vaccine Research Group. He adds that 99.2% of the recorded COVID-19 deaths in the U.S. are in people not vaccinated against the virus.  This is why he cautions folks who may be traveling this Fourth of July holiday and throughout the summer.  "You don't know what variants people are carrying, how symptomatic they are, the health of their immune system, or if they've been vaccinated," says Dr. Poland. "When you are around groups of people indoors that are not in your bubble, so to speak, I think you should still wear a proper mask."  In this Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Poland explains why, even if you are fully vaccinated for COVID-19, you should still consider being masked in some situations. He also discusses breakthrough infections in certain subpopulations, and what that may mean for needing booster shots. AskMayoExpert COVID-19 Resources: https://askmayoexpert.mayoclinic.org/navigator/COVID-19 Connect with the Mayo Clinic’s School of Continuous Professional Development online at https://ce.mayo.edu/ or on Twitter @MayoMedEd.
July 7, 2021

Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome (POTS) in Adult Patients

Guest: Jeremy K. Cutsforth-Gregory, M.D. (@JCGneuro) Host: Darryl S. Chutka, M.D. (@ChutkaMD) Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome, or POTS, is a medical condition manifested by tachycardia that occurs after standing or prolonged sitting and is often associated with symptoms such as dizziness, fatigue, and occasionally syncope. POTS can be difficult to diagnose as patients often present with a variety of vague, and what seem like unrelated, symptoms. Management of patients with POTS can be equally difficult as there’s no one treatment which is effective in all patients. However, patients with POTS often have typical symptoms and objective findings on physical exam. Once a diagnosis is made, effective treatment is available and many patients with POTS can be helped with non-pharmacologic therapy. To help us understand POTS and its management, we’ll speak with Dr. Jeremy Cutsforth-Gregory, a neurologist at the Mayo Clinic. We’ll discuss the proposed theories regarding the cause of POTS, the different types of POTS, pathologic findings in patients with POTS, and the management of patient with POTS. Specific Topics: Typical symptoms of POTS Risk factors for POTS Theories regarding the cause of POTS Description of the varieties of POTS How to diagnose POTS Pathologic and pharmacologic abnormalities related to POTS Management of patients with POTS Connect with the Mayo Clinic’s School of Continuous Professional Development online at https://ce.mayo.edu/ or on Twitter @MayoMedEd.
July 6, 2021

Mayo Clinic Talks

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Darryl Chutka, M.D.

Darryl Chutka, M.D.

Internist | Geriatrician | Educator | Host

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