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Her Story

Envisioning the Leadership Possibilities in Healthcare

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75: Building Trust Before Crisis, with Denise Cardo, M.D., Director, Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion (DHQP), National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID)

Meet Denise Cardo, M.D.:Denise Cardo, M.D. is the director of the Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion, Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). She first joined the CDC as a medical epidemiologist. Prior to the CDC, she worked in the division of infectious diseases at Escola Paulista de Medicina in Sao Paulo, Brazil, where she also received her medical degree. Key Insights:Denise Cardo, M.D. brings partners together to achieve goals in patient safety. Developing Partnerships. For creating effective partnerships, Dr. Cardo recommenders setting common goals and clear expectations. Develop trust and understanding before a crisis occurs, so that uncertainty can be faced with teamwork. (5:26)Embracing Identity. Dr. Cardo was nervous about having an accent, but a mentor told her to take advantage of it instead. She jokes that she never has to introduce herself on a conference call. Dr. Cardo decided that her accent, and affinity for brightly colored clothing, made her unique and she should embrace her full identity. (19:53)Empowering Ourselves. Dr. Cardo shares that sometimes people will talk to a male colleague over her, even though she is the division’s director. She was worried about how to stand up for herself in those types of situations, because she knows she represents her program. Dr. Cardo chose to enlist the help of her male colleagues to combat these instances of sexism. (24:03)This episode is hosted by Julie Gerberding, M.D. She is a member of the Advisory Council for Her Story and the Chief Executive Officer at the Foundation for the National Institutes of Health.Relevant Links:Learn more about Dr. CardoLearn more about the Division of Healthcare Quality PromotionRead “Public Health Hero: Denise Cardo” 
May 18, 2022

74: Boosting Career Potential Through Mentorship, with Renee DeSilva, Melinda Buntin, Ph.D., and JaeLynn Williams

Meet the Guests:This episode features three leaders previously showcased on Her Story and the powerful advice they received from mentors. Renee DeSilva is the CEO of The Health Management Academy. Melinda B. Buntin, Ph.D. is a Mike Curb Professor and Chair of the Department of Health Policy at Vanderbilt University. And JaeLynn Williams, the CEO of Air Methods.Key Insights:Mentors play an important role in career trajectory by providing advice, perspective, and direction.Personal and Professional Development. Renee’s mentor provided an outside perspective, helping her understand her unique strengths and areas for improvement. (1:07)Maintaining Job Opportunities. Dr. Buntin’s mentor pointed out that too many consecutive roles in government would limit her job opportunities in academia. Due to that advice, Dr. Buntin maintained her connections and continued to publish research to keep those doors open. (3:21)What is Your Ideal Job? Jaelynn was given the advice to start with the end in mind. To think about her ideal job and work backwards to determine the experiences and skills necessary to achieve that. This informed her choice to leave a company she worked at for many years to pursue a new opportunity. (4:51)
May 11, 2022

73: The Beauty of Math, with Cindy Lawrence, Executive Director and CEO, National Museum of Mathematics (MoMath)

Meet Cindy Lawrence:Cindy Lawrence is the Executive Director and CEO of the National Museum of Mathematics (MoMath). She started as a volunteer for the organization, and served in a variety of roles including Chief of Operations, Associate Director, and Co-executive Director. She also directs extracurricular mathematics programs with Brookhaven National Laboratory. Previously, she was a Lead Instructor and National Editor for Becker Professional Education. Cindy received a Bachelor’s degree in business administration from the University of Buffalo, and an MBA from Hofstra University. Key Insights:Cindy Lawrence is a math enthusiast and leader of the only museum of mathematics in North America: The National Museum of Mathematics (MoMath).Fundraising Through Passion. Asking people for money can be awkward. However, Cindy found that if she focuses on sharing what she’s excited about, and ignites interest in others,the fundraising naturally follows. She has raised millions of dollars for MoMath, and credits it to her passion for math. (4:07)Virtual Museum. Early on, Cindy directed her leadership team to brainstorm and prepare for a potential shut down. This allowed MoMath to smoothly transition to zoom events when the pandemic started. Now, Cindy is working on optimizing hybrid programing for in-person visits, as well as for groups around the country that enjoy MoMath virtually. (17:03)Be Careful What You Volunteer For. Cindy started as a volunteer, but found that she spent more and more of her time at MoMath. She eventually made the leap, leaving an organization she had worked with for 18 years, to work at MoMath full-time. (26:08)This episode is hosted by Julie Gerberding, M.D. She is a member of the Advisory Council for Her Story and the CEO of the Foundation for the National Institutes of Health.Relevant Links:Learn more about The National Museum of MathematicsListen to “Steven Strogatz Interviews Cindy Lawrence, Executive Director & CEO of National Museum of Mathematics”Stay update with MoMath on Twitter
May 4, 2022

72: Relentless Optimism, with Megan Ranney, M.D., MPH, Emergency Physician and Academic Dean of Public Health, Brown University

Meet Megan Ranney, M.D., MPH:Megan Ranney, M.D., MPH is the Academic Dean of the School of Public Health and the founding Director of the Brown-Lifespan Center for Digital Health at Brown University. She is co-founder and Senior Strategic Advisor to the American Foundation for Firearm Injury Reduction in Medicine at the Aspen Institute. Dr. Ranney is also an emergency physician, researcher, and contributor to media outlets including MSNBC, The New York Times, and The Washington Post. She received a Bachelors in the History of Science from Harvard University, and received her medical degree from Columbia University. Key Insights:Megan Ranney, M.D., MPH is a practicing emergency physician, researcher, and advocate for innovative approaches to health.Relationships. Dr. Ranney’s network of peers provide practical advice as well as social support. She also has mentors and sponsors who have helped create career opportunities for her. Building relationships and friendships are fundamental to career development and career enjoyment. (6:56)Finding Common Ground. Dr. Ranney works with controversial topics. She points out that generally people agree on goals, but disagree on the strategy. A way to build sustainable, community-based solutions is to take away the judgement, focus on the shared goal, and find paths to solutions that converge across stakeholders. (26:26)Balance. Dr. Ranney describes that during different points in her life she was either more focused on her home and family, or prioritized career goals and leaned on her support system. This is okay. Accept that the flux is part of life, and ensure that over the long-run you feel balanced. (30:12)This episode is hosted by Ceci Connolly. She is a member of the Advisory Council for Her Story and President and CEO of the Alliance of Community Health Plans.Relevant Links:Learn more about Dr. RanneyFollow Dr. Ranney on Twitter
April 27, 2022

71: Trending on Twitter, with Vineet Arora, M.D., Stacy Hurt, and Kimberly Manning, M.D.

Meet the Guests:This episode showcases three guests previously featured on Her Story. Vineet Arora, M.D. is the Dean for Medical Education at the University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine. Stacy Hurt is a Patient Engagement Consultant and HIMSS Digital Influencer. Kimberly Manning, M.D. is the Associate Vice Chair of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion for the Department of Medicine at Emory University School of Medicine.Key Insights:Social media and the internet have become a growing part of personal and professional careers.Twitter. Dr. Arora uses twitter to correct misconceptions about medicine and discuss important issues in medical education. (1:23)Social Media. Through social media, Stacey discusses and amplifies challenges for patients and caregivers. From her computer, she can reach peers across the country. (3:48)Blogs and Podcasts. Dr. Manning’s blog highlights underrepresented stories of Black patients. Additionally, her podcast provides virtual mentorship for the next generation of health professionals. (6:00)
April 20, 2022

70: Empowering Girls Across the Globe, with Jessica Posner Odede, CEO, Girl Effect; Co-founder and Board Member, Shining Hope for Communities

Meet Jessica Posner Odede:Jessica Posner Odede is the CEO of Girl Effect. She is also a Co-founder and Board Member of Shining Hope for Communities (SHOFCO). Previously, she was an Associate Direction at Novastar Ventures. Jessica is the author of “Find Me Unafraid: Love, Loss and Hope in an African Slum.” She received a bachelor’s in African American Studies from Wesleyan University. Key Insights:From Denver, Colorado to Nairobi, Kenya, Jessica Posner Odede is changing the world for adolescent girls. What is Girl Effect? Girl Effect utilizes media and technology to connect adolescent girls to services and opportunities, like education, finance, and healthcare. They work to decrease barriers and combat internalized gender norms, to create a world where girls are able to take control of their bodies, health, and livelihoods. (1:36)Creating Demand. Investments in services for adolescent girls has increased over time; however, the public and social sector fall short in decreasing the demand gap. Driving demand for important services requires tackling gender norms, decreasing barriers, and providing role models. (17:44)COVID’s Impact on Women. There are 20 million girls out of school due to the pandemic, and many will never go back. The pandemic has decreased schooling and vaccination rates, and increased gender-based violence. The pandemic has created additional challenges for women across the world. (23:32)This episode is hosted by Julie Gerberding, M.D. She is a member of the Advisory Council for Her Story and the Chief Patient Officer and Executive Vice President at Merck.Relevant Links:Learn more about Girl EffectFollow Jessica on TwitterWatch “WISE On-Air: A Conversation On Girl Empowerment Through Media”
April 13, 2022

Her Story

Her Story is developed by women for women to share stories that expand their vision of what is possible as healthcare leaders. Hosted by Her Story Advisory Council.
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Team

Ceci Connolly

Ceci Connolly

Joanne M. Conroy, M.D.

Joanne M. Conroy, M.D.

Kristi Ebong

Kristi Ebong

Julie Gerberding, M.D.

Julie Gerberding, M.D.

Sanjula Jain, Ph.D.

Sanjula Jain, Ph.D.

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