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Her Story

Envisioning the Leadership Possibilities in Healthcare

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Trailblazing Leadership

Meet Joanne Conroy, M.D.:Joanne Conroy, M.D. is the CEO and President of Dartmouth Health. She was also recently elected by the American Hospital Association (AHA) to be their chair-elect designate. Prior to Dartmouth Health, Dr. Conroy served as CEO of Lahey Hospital and Medical Center (formerly the Lahey Clinic). She also served as Chief Health Care Officer for the Association of American Medical Colleges. Dr. Conroy received her undergraduate degree in chemistry from Dartmouth College and an M.D. from the University of South Carolina. Key Insights:Dr. Conroy discusses her overarching vision for leadership and change in healthcare. Career Advice. Dr. Conroy tells every woman on a leadership trajectory that they need to have an appetite for personal and professional risk and be willing to move. Have that conversation with your family unit about what career progression and balance would look like. Broadening Horizons. For women that can’t move, Dr. Conroy recommends broadening your scope, and looking for opportunities outside of your organization. There may be opportunities for leadership in your community. Most important is to fulfill that role with purpose, and when achieve your goals don’t feel shy about telling others.Equity of Opportunity. To develop the next generation of women leaders requires developing leadership training and programing to identify future leaders, as well as creating opportunities for those people to demonstrate their leadership. Training isn’t useful without the opportunity to apply it. This episode is hosted by Gary Bisbee, Ph.D. He is the Founder, Chairman, and CEO of Think Medium. Relevant Links:Follow Dr. Conroy on TwitterRead “AHA Board Names Joanne M. Conroy, M.D., as Chair-Elect Designate”
September 21, 2022

The Power of Partnerships

Meet Dora Mills:Dora Mills, M.D. is the Chief Health Improvement Officer of MaineHealth. Previously, she was the Vice President for Clinical Affairs and Director for the Center of Health Innovation at the University ofNew England. She also served as the Medical Director of MaineCare, and the Director of Public  Health for the Maine State Government. Dr. Mills received a Bachelor’s in Biology and Russian from Bowdin College, an M.D. from the University of Vermont, and a Master of Public Health from Harvard University.Key Insights:Dr. Mills’ experience exemplifies the power of partnerships in healthcare and public health. • Words of Encouragement. One day in college, the head of the Biology Department  told Dr. Mills she should consider medical school. It was the first time someone  encouraged her to think about a medical career, and it gave her the confidence to  pursue one. Today, Dr. Mills tries to provide the same encouragement as a mentor. • Public-Private Partnerships. Maine achieved high levels of vaccination through  partnerships. Companies like L.L. Bean lent employees to staff vaccine clinics.Additionally, breweries and restaurants across the state hosted clinics, offering free  beer and food to those who got vaccinated. • Women in Public Service. Dr. Mills has seen many great women leaders, including  her sister, the current Governor of Maine. For women interested in running for  office, there are programs to help. And if you run for office, seek out advice, butmake sure to still be who you are and use your own voice. This episode is hosted by Joanne Conroy, M.D. She is a member of the Advisory Council for Her Story and serves as the CEO and President of Dartmouth-Hitchcock and Dartmouth-Hitchcock Health. 
September 16, 2022

79: Timing is Everything

Meet Anjali Kataria:Anjali Kataria is the CEO and Co-Founder of Mytonomy. She served in the Obama Administration as one of the first Entrepreneurs in Residence at the FDA. She also served as Senior Technology Advisor in the Office of the CIO to the President at the EOP. She also co-founded and was Chief Marketing Officer for Conformia Software. When that company was acquired by Oracle, she became Oracle’s VP of Product Strategy. Her first entrepreneurial endeavor was Riva Commerce Inc, where Anjali served as co-founder and CEO. Anjali received a Bachelor’s in Public Policy from Duke University and a Master’s in Public Policy from Harvard University.  Key Insights:Anjali Kataria is a serial entrepreneur, with two decades of healthcare and enterprise software experience. Timing is Everything. Anjali’s first company had a great software product, but ultimately folded. It was the best product of its type on the market, but implementation was too expensive. Anjali notes if the product had come out years later, advancements in technology would make implementation much more reasonable. The Power of Streaming. Mytonomy uses content streaming, like Netflix or Hulu, to help providers reach patients with health information. Patients can access the content in the comfort of their own homes and whenever is most convenient for them.Finding Your Balance. For Anjali, she strikes a balance between work and family over a two week to ten-day period. That is what works for her and her family. Each person will be fulfilled by different approaches to balance. This episode is hosted by Nancy Howell Agee. She is a member of the Advisory Council for Her Story and is the President and CEO of Carilion Clinic. Relevant Links:Learn more about MytonomyWatch “Mytonomy Announces TV Channel on the ROKU® Platform”
September 7, 2022

78: End-of-Life Care: Doing What’s Right for Patients

Meet Amber Barnato, M.D.:Amber Barnato, M.D. is the John E. Wennberg Distinguished Professor and the Director of The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice at the Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth. She is trained in two medical specialties, public health and preventive medicine, and hospice and palliative medicine. Dr. Barnato received a bachelor’s from the University of California at Berkeley, an M.D. from Harvard Medical School, an MPH from the University of California at Berkeley, and an MS from Stanford University. Key Insights:Amber Barnato, M.D. explores how her medical career experiences led her to the focus of palliative and end-of-life care.  Expanding Horizons. Dr. Barnato took a year before medical school to be a research assistant and speech writer for Assistant Surgeon General Dr. McGinnis. That experience expanded her horizons, exposing her to the policy process, and Dr. McGinnis served a sponsor, improving her medical school candidacy.Path to Palliative Care. Dr. Barnato was morally distressed by the end-of-life care she saw in her general surgery internship, which lacked emotional support, conversations with family, and concerns over quality of life. After listening to a story about end-of-life care research on the radio, she decided she wanted to join the research effort herself. Next Steps for the Dartmouth Atlas. The Dartmouth Atlas focuses on overuse and unwarranted variation of healthcare. However, Dr. Barnato wants the Atlas to expand to underuse and unjust variation. She would like to see a focus on health equity.  This episode is hosted by Joanne Conroy, M.D. She is a member of the Advisory Council for Her Story and is the CEO and President of Dartmouth-Hitchcock and Dartmouth-Hitchcock Health. Relevant Links:Learn more about Dr. Barnato and her researchFollow Dr. Barnato on Twitter
August 31, 2022

77: Fighting Islamophobia in Medicine, Media, and Society

Key Insights:Suzanne Barakat, M.D. experienced personal tragedy, and was forced to fight through her grief to combat islamophobia in medicine, media, and society. Reluctant Activist. Dr. Barakat’s Brother, his wife, and her sister were murdered by a white supremacist for being Muslim. Additionally, two of Dr. Barakat’s relatives were assassinated for their political activism and journalism, presumably by the Assad regime. Neither case received much media attention, and Dr. Barakat became a reluctant activist, fighting for media coverage and that the cases be investigated.Health and Human Rights Initiative. This initiative provides pro bono forensic medical evaluations for asylum seekers. Medical professionals perform a full physical exam and psychological evaluation to corroborate the stories of violence from asylum seekers. This process greatly increases the likelihood of obtaining asylum.What Leaders Can Do. Healthcare leaders have a responsibility to ensure that their workforce represents their patient demographic, this leads to better health outcomes and quality of care for patients. Additionally, leaders must play a role in making their staff feel valued and supported, and implement safe and anonymous ways to report violations. This episode is hosted by Joanne Conroy, M.D. She is a member of the Advisory Council for Her Story and is the CEO and President of Dartmouth-Hitchcock and Dartmouth-Hitchcock Health. Relevant Links:Learn more about the Health and Human Rights InitiativeWatch Dr. Barakat’s TED talk: “Islamophobia killed my brother. Let’s end the hate”
August 24, 2022

76: The New Health Economy: For Women Leaders, with Sanjula Jain, Ph.D., Member of the Her Story Advisory Council and SVP of Market Strategy & Chief Research Officer of Trilliant Health

Meet Sanjula Jain, Ph.D.:Sanjula Jain, Ph.D. is SVP of Market Strategy and Chief Research Office at Trilliant Health and a Co-founder of Think Medium. She also serves as an Adjunct Assistant Professor at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in the Division of Clinical Informatics. Previously, she was the Executive Director of Research and Advisory at The Health Management Academy. She received a B.A. in Psychology and Ecology & Evolutionary Biology from Rice University, and a Ph.D. in Health Services Research and Health Policy from Emory University.Key Insights:Sanjula Jain, Ph.D. is co-author of “The New Health Economy: Ground Rules for Leaders.” It’s an overview the history and impact of health care politics, policy, providers, and personalization.Defining Healthcare. The New Health Economy serves as a framework for understanding healthcare. Healthcare is a $4 trillion economy, with many stakeholders and silos. Making meaningful change in a specific area requires understanding and accounting for the many other pieces of the healthcare equation. (7:46)The Writing Process. The best writing advice is simple, but effective: chunk it up. Outlining, even if you don’t stick to it, provides a starting point and helps define the scope of the project. Additionally, Dr. Jain knows she writes best in the morning, so she set aside 15-30 minutes each morning to write a paragraph or just a few bullet points. (15:11)Healthcare Expertise. It’s common for women leaders to doubt their expertise. Dr. Jain reminds us that you don’t need to know everything about healthcare. It’s hard to be an expert because healthcare is a complicated industry. Being an expert is a balance between breadth and depth. (22:11)This episode is hosted by Ceci Connolly. She is a member of the Advisory Council for Her Story and is President and CEO of the Alliance of Community Health Plans.Relevant Links:Check out “The New Health Economy: Ground Rules for Leaders”Check out Dr. Jain’s website
May 25, 2022

Her Story

Her Story is developed by women for women to share stories that expand their vision of what is possible as healthcare leaders. Hosted by Her Story Advisory Council.
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Team

Ceci Connolly

Ceci Connolly

Joanne M. Conroy, M.D.

Joanne M. Conroy, M.D.

Kristi Ebong

Kristi Ebong

Julie Gerberding, M.D.

Julie Gerberding, M.D.

Sanjula Jain, Ph.D.

Sanjula Jain, Ph.D.

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