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#151: A Caring Series: Caring for Others

Healthcare’s MissingLogic Podcast

#151: A Caring Series: Caring for Others

This episode talks about Caring for Others and why it’s important for Thriving, Resilient, and Unstoppable (TRU) leaders.
June 1, 2022

#151: A Caring Series: Caring for Others

In this second episode of our three-part series, we discuss Caring for Others and why it’s important for Thriving, Resilient, and Unstoppable (TRU) leaders.

We know serving others is in your DNA as healthcare clinicians and leaders. We’ve been indoctrinated to become servant leaders, always focusing on the needs of our team and organization before our own needs.

Servant leadership is not a bad thing. In fact, this approach to leadership is very rewarding and honorable until you “over-serve” and neglect yourself. As a result, you’ll end up feeling stressed, exhausted, and unfulfilled.

In this podcast, we share a few of our tips for Caring for Others that we put into action with our team, clients, and families.

We also discuss some of the benefits of Caring for Others and some of the consequences of over-serving your team and organizations.

For full show notes and links, visit:

https://www.missinglogic.com/new-podcast

If you found value in this episode, please subscribe and leave us a review on Apple Podcasts!

Enrollment is open to our Self-Study Program, Caring for Others Without Neglecting YOU!

This self-study program is specifically designed for healthcare leaders like you, so you can find a way to care for your team without neglecting you.

Click Here NOW to learn more and enroll!

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