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Ep 45: Medicine in Movies: Working for Accurate Representation of Psychiatry with Stephanie Hartselle, M.D., CEO, Hartselle and Associates; Clinical Associate Professor, Brown University

Her Story

Ep 45: Medicine in Movies: Working for Accurate Representation of Psychiatry with Stephanie Hartselle, M.D., CEO, Hartselle and Associates; Clinical Associate Professor, Brown University

In this special episode of Her Story, we are joined by Stephanie Hartselle, the CEO of Hartselle and Associates and Clinical Associate Professor at Brown University. The conversation explores moving…
September 8, 2021

Ep 45: Medicine in Movies: Working for Accurate Representation of Psychiatry with Stephanie Hartselle, M.D., CEO, Hartselle and Associates; Clinical Associate Professor, Brown University

Meet Dr. Hartselle:

Dr. Stephanie Hartselle is a pediatric and adult Psychiatrist and the CEO of Hartselle & Associates, a private practice for psychotherapy and psychopharmacology. She is an Assistant Clinical Professor of Psychiatry and Human Behavior at Brown University. She is a consultant for directors and screen writers from Netflix to Warner Bros., helping better depict mental illness in television and film. She received her medical degree from Northwestern University in Chicago, Illinois.

In This Episode:

Dr. Stephanie Hartselle shares her path to medicine and the challenges she overcame to create a private practice. As a professor at Brown University, Dr. Hartselle combines her love of psychiatry with her favorite pastime, streaming movies and shows. Her courses include analysis on how mental illnesses are depicted in media. This led to Warner Bros. reaching out to Dr. Hartselle for her insights for “Birds of Prey,” one of DC’s feature films about Harley Quinn. Dr. Hartselle has an honest discussion about what it means to be a woman, and part of a family, in medicine.

Key Moments:

  • Don’t tell me “No” (9:28)
  • How to develop a private practice (12:54)
  • Working with Warner Bros. (18:21)
  • Moms in medicine (30:03)

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