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Healing the Community: How Health Centers Can Address Community Violence

At the Core of Care

Healing the Community: How Health Centers Can Address Community Violence

In this episode, we have a conversation with two community health professionals about the role community health centers play in addressing community violence.
December 5, 2022

Healing the Community: How Health Centers Can Address Community Violence

In this episode, we have a conversation with two community health professionals about the role community health centers play in addressing community violence. Cheryl Seay and Wayne Clark share how they are working to improve access to health care and reduce violence in their communities. Seay and Clark are interviewed by Jillian Bird, Director of Training and Technical Assistance at the National Nurse-Led Care Consortium to support providers working at community health centers across the country.

Cheryl Seay is the Program Manager for the Center for Community Health Workers at Penn Medicine at Home and is the founder of the Jarrell Christopher Seay Love and Laughter Foundation, a nonprofit focused on addressing gun violence and community health. Wayne Clark is a Health Navigator at Roots Community Health Center, Inc. He is also the founder and executive director at Oakland Impact Center, which provides innovative counseling, mentoring, skill building, violence prevention training, and more.

Support for this episode comes from the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). It is part of an award totaling $550,000 with zero percentage financed with non-governmental sources. The contents are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent the official views of, nor an endorsement, by HRSA, HHS, or the U.S. Government.

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