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DEFINING FINE: The Essential 1st Step In Patient Treatment

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DEFINING FINE: The Essential 1st Step In Patient Treatment

COURSE DESCRIPTION: The experience and education that can be provided by the patient population is an unhailed source of invaluable education for continuing professional development - not only for nurses,…
March 18, 2022

DEFINING FINE: The Essential 1st Step In Patient Treatment

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

The experience and education that can be provided by the patient population is an unhailed source of invaluable education for continuing professional development – not only for nurses, but for all healthcare professionals. Lianne Saffer’s story illustrates that precisely, and presently, as facilitators Antra Boyd and Karen DiMarco were changed as professionals and humans by the end of this podcast course.

Diagnosed with breast cancer at the age of 33, she was given one course of treatment and told that she was going to be “fine.” She didn’t know then that their definition of “fine” was worlds apart from her own, and how conventional medicine’s algorithmic treatment of her diagnosis, rather than an individualized approach, would devastate her vitality and her life.

When Lianne woke up to the dissonance between ‘their fine and hers,’ she took back the reins of her treatment course, and ownership of her healthcare. She did her own research, found her voice, authored an outcome that she could accept, then became a champion for others to do the same.

OBJECTIVES:

Upon completion of this course participants will be able to:

  1. Recognize the importance of a establishing a patient’s personal definition of “fine” in their treatment plan.
  2. Explain how a patient’s “fully-informed decision” contributes to the quality of their treatment. 
  3. Discuss how healthcare providers’ humility & empathy contribute to a collaborative, quality patient experience.

COURSE OUTLINE:

I.    Introductions

II.   Jumping-in to the deep-end: Lianne’s Story

     A. The Urgency Train: I’m 33, I’m going to die

     B. Their “fine”: Chop things off, chemo

III.  But wait, there’s alternatives?

     A. Research

IV.  Finding her voice

     A. Bringing the research, making your case

     B. Defining your treatment Vs. getting sucked-into theirs

V.  Obstacles

     A. Resistant caregivers

     B. Finances – insurance only pays for the ‘algorithms’

VI. It wasn’t over

     A. Toxic breast reconstruction

     B. Autoimmune issues – Hashimotos, SIBO, etc

VII. Please Don’t Send Me Flowers

     A. It’s more helpful to know it sucks

     B. Let me blow my nose with your pink ribbon

VIII. Having good boundaries is the best prevention

IX. What does it mean to “own your health?”

X.  Everybody’s right. Partially

XI. Regrets and ‘would haves.’

XII. Coaching and contact

ABOUT THE INSTRUCTOR:

Lianne Saffer often describes her life as: “An endless quest to feel it all.” She is a wife, mother, writer, fitness instructor, hair stylist, life coach, author, and advocate for helping people live ‘a loud and authentic life.’

From divorce, to coming out, to cancer, in her book: Please, Don’t Send Me Flowers, Lianne shares how she gained resilience, wisdom, and trust for herself, through the painful discovery even healthcare professionals don’t always know what’s best for you.

Lianne believes that we should all get a little louder, and use our voices to help create true empathy and understanding. She believes in raising strong women, and telling the truth about hard situations by opening conversations that society has closed, and asking questions about things we were taught not to. Her mission is to reach and empower as many people as possible with her writing, coaching, and speaking events.

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