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Bone Health:  Why It's Not Just your Grandmother's Concern | Dr. Jerilynn Prior

Fempower Health

Bone Health: Why It's Not Just your Grandmother's Concern | Dr. Jerilynn Prior

June 7, 2022

Bone Health: Why It's Not Just your Grandmother's Concern | Dr. Jerilynn Prior

According to the CDC, overall, the age-adjusted prevalence of osteoporosis among adults aged 50 and over increased from 9.4% in 2007–2008 to 12.6% in 2017–2018 (See this Figure). Osteoporosis prevalence among women increased from 14.0% in 2007–2008 to 19.6% in 2017–2018. And according to this episode’s guest, Dr. Jerilynn Prior, osteoporosis is not something only older women should concern themselves with. It begins in adolescence.

Dr. Jerilynn Prior, of the Centre for Menstrual Cycle and Ovulation Research (CeMCOR), is a Professor of Endocrinology and Metabolism at the University of British Columbia, with 40 years experience in women’s health.  

We discuss the following about bone health.

  • What are the foundations for good bone health?
  • What causes poor bone health and why is bone health important?
  • What are the best vitamins & supplements for bone health?  Which forms and doses of them do you need?
  • How are the types of foods you eat connected to bone health?
  • What causes bones to decrease during adolescence and what can you do to strengthen bones  in adolescence?
  • Can you reverse bone loss?  And is osteoporosis hereditary?
  • Your questions about collagen and medications answered!

“It is still not in the textbooks that progesterone increased bone formation.  20% the change in bone over one year was related to the length of the luteal phase.  Dietary intake was only 3%.”  – Dr. Jerilynn Prior

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Resources:

 

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**The information shared by Fempower Health is not medical advice but for information purposes to enable you to have more effective conversations with your doctor.  Always talk to your doctor before making health-related decisions. Additionally, the views expressed by the Fempower Health podcast guests are their own and their appearance on the program does not imply an endorsement of them or any entity they represent.**

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More about Dr. Jerilynn Prior

Jerilynn C. Prior BA, MD, FRCPC investigates women’s menstrual cycles, population variability of ovulation and physiological associations of ovulatory disturbances within regular cycles with osteoporosis, cardiovascular disease and breast cancer and endometrial cancer risks. She also studies the hormonal and experience changes in perimenopause and treatment of perimenopausal and menopausal hot flushes with progesterone. 

She is the 2019 recipient of the Michael Smith Foundation for Health Research Aubrey J. Tingle Prize awarded to a “BC clinician scientist whose work in health research is internationally recognized”. She is Scientific Director of the Centre for Menstrual Cycle and Ovulation Research (CeMCOR, since 2002) with its website (www.cemcor.ca) providing practical evidence-based information through a mean of 3,000 page-views/day.  She has led the British Columbia Centre of the population-based Canadian Multicentre Osteoporosis Study (CaMos) since 1994. In addition to authoring over 200 peer-reviewed papers (H Index 65), Dr. Prior is the author of the award-winning book, Estrogen’s Storm Season: Stories of Perimenopause (2005, 2nd ed. 2018), a novel written to inform/empower women with perimenopause information.

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