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Episode 4: How do we build awareness of damage we cannot see?

The Most Important Medicine: Responding to Trauma and Creating Resilience in Primary Care

Episode 4: How do we build awareness of damage we cannot see?

August 17, 2022

Episode 4: How do we build awareness of damage we cannot see?

In this short podcast, Dr. Amy takes you through a brief history of the ACE study and discusses the study’s challenges and limitations. She then takes a walk through the history and impact of the study, including the infamous TED talk that Dr. Nadine Burke-Harris presented. Dr. Amy then takes you through some of the elements needed to understand trauma, including the categories of trauma, definitions of both historical and intergenerational trauma, and, most importantly, ties together the implications trauma can have on chronic diseases.

By the end of this podcast, you’ll have additional knowledge about the types of hidden traumas that your patients may have experienced, how to understand the broad scope of trauma, and the importance of building trauma screening into everyday practice. And if you thought that this only applied to providers, you will learn that every step in a patient’s healthcare journey is impacted by trauma, and awareness amongst every team member is essential.  

WHO SHOULD LISTEN: Physicians, nurses, healthcare providers, psychologists, people 

RESOURCES
National Childhood Traumatic Stress Network
Dr. Amy’s Provider Newsletter
Provider Lounge Membership

FREE DOWNLOADS
Provider Lounge Virtual Meeting Freebie
Start Creating Boundaries Handout & Script
Guide To Creating Cultures of Trust At Work

Don’t Forget! Follow Dr. Amy on LinkedIn, Facebook, and Instagram
For more information visit www.doctoramyllc.com 

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