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Menstrual Health Equity:  Why it Matters to Us All

Fempower Health

Menstrual Health Equity: Why it Matters to Us All

May 23, 2022

Menstrual Health Equity: Why it Matters to Us All

Guests Michela Bedard of PERIOD. and Claire Coder of Aunt Flow discuss important menstrual health issues.  With 50% of the population menstruating, it is shocking to see the degree of inequities that still exist.  This podcast episode is intended to raise awareness and instill a sense of urgency about menstrual health equity and why having a shared language around “normal” periods is critical.

We cover the following menstrual health issues:

  • Why menstrual health equity is important and why inequity still remains
  • How menstrual health equity differs across race, gender, and socioeconomic statuses
  • The negative societal impact of menstrual health inequity and how equity can positively impact us all
  • The role each of us can play to advance the menstrual health equity movement

“In the United States, eight states have passed legislation requiring middle schools and high schools, sometimes elementary schools, to offer free period products in the bathroom, not the nurse’s office in the bathroom. And why that matters is if you think about what happens in the bathroom versus the nurse’s office. Bathrooms are for natural bodily functions. You go to the nurse’s office when you’re sick.” – Claire Coder, Aunt Flow

“Policy follows culture. We’re starting to see culture change.  We’re starting to see social media deal with menstruation and starting to see more femtech companies pop up. We’re seeing Claire’s Aunt Flow company be successful.  We’re seeing hundreds of PERIOD. chapters being formed every year. But the policy implications haven’t really caught up yet. They’re just starting to.”  – Michela Bedard, PERIOD.

Resources:

Spotify Podcast Playlist on Women’s Health Foundations and Menstrual Health

Learn about Menstrual Hygiene Day

If you liked this episode and you’re feeling generous, don’t forget to leave a review on iTunes or Spotify!

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**The information shared by Fempower Health is not medical advice but for information purposes to enable you to have more effective conversations with your doctor.  Always talk to your doctor before making health-related decisions. 

**Contains affiliate links and I will be compensated if you make a purchase after clicking on my links**

About Michela Bedard

Michela Bedard, Executive Director of PERIOD., is committed to building a better future. She believes that every person deserves dignity and the chance to be seen for their full humanity. 

 

Michela brings nearly two decades of experience in program management, fundraising and advocacy within non-profit, corporate, political and civic organizations. From big-picture creativity to day-to-day operations, Michela produces strategic partnerships and develops robust networks to strengthen organizations and movements seeking to tackle systemic inequality. 

 

In addition to her work with PERIOD., Michela currently serves as Chair of the Board of Rahab’s Sisters, a Portland non-profit serving marginalized women or those whose gender makes them vulnerable. She also serves on the Governing Board of the Episcopal Bishop of Oregon Foundation, the Oregon Alliance for Gun Safety, and on committees within Portland Public Schools.

 

Michela holds a master’s degree in Public Administration and a bachelor’s degree from the University of Southern California. 

About Claire Coder

Claire Coder (Forbes 30under30) is the founder and CEO of Aunt Flow. On a mission to make the world better for people with periods, Aunt Flow stocks organizations with tampons and pads. Coder launched her first company at age 16, designed a bag for Vera Bradley that sold out in 24 hours, and has her own line of GIFs. The 24-year-old Thiel Fellow has been featured in TeenVogue, Forbes, and starred in TLC’s Girl Starter Season 1. When she is not jamming out to Macklemore, she is teaching Zumba classes.

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