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Health Policy Podcasts

Podcasts by, and for, health policy experts about complex and important topics
Health Podcasts about Policy

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Lowering Medicare eligibility may improve cancer outcomes

"I think we need to step back first before we even ask the policy question and ask this simple question, is it okay in the United States to die of cancer simply because you don't have health insurance?" - Dr. Gerard SilvestriCancer is a leading cause of death in the United States. Although there have been declines in cancer deaths in recent years, improvements have not been equally distributed across the population.The risk of cancer increases with age and nearly a quarter of all new cancers diagnosed each year in the US occur among those aged 55 to 64 years old. At age 65, most Americans gain Medicare coverage, creating a ready comparison of cancer outcomes between those just below age 65 — who may have private insurance, Medicaid, or are uninsured — and those above 65 who are on Medicare.The relationship between insurance coverage and cancer outcomes is the subject of this episode of A Health Podyssey.  Dr. Gerard Silvestri, a professor of thoracic oncology at the Medical University of South Carolina, joins the program to discuss a paper he and co-authors published in the May 2021 issue of Health Affairs wherein they found significantly worse survival rates for uninsured patients ages 60 to 64 in comparison to Medicare beneficiaries.Listen to Alan Weil interview Gerard Silvestri on cancer outcomes among Medicare beneficiaries and their younger, uninsured counterparts.Subscribe: RSS | Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Google Podcasts
May 18, 2021
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Three unanswered questions for telehealth's future

The COVID-19 pandemic reshaped the telehealth landscape. Many physicians and patients had their first experience with a telehealth visit as lockdown measures limited in-person physician offices. Many questions remain whether the telehealth explosion is a flash-in-the-pan success or if it will have long-lasting changes in patient visit behaviors. Health Affairs' Chris Fleming and Rob Lott join Health Affairs This Week to discuss a recently published series of blog articles on the topic and unpack the biggest questions regarding the future of telehealth, including:  Should Medicare continue payment parity? Where does payment reform stand on telehealth? What are current barriers affecting implementation of telehealth?  Related Links: The Coming Conflict Over Tele-Visits: The Need For Innovation In Payment And Information Sharing (Health Affairs Blog) Understanding The Case For Telehealth Payment Parity (Health Affairs Blog) Congress: Act Now To Ensure Telehealth Access For Medicare Benefits (Health Affairs Blog) Mutual Recognition Of Physician Licensure By States Would Provide For Better Patient Care (Health Affairs Blog) How Telehealth Can Enable New Care Management Strategies In Alternative Payment Models (Health Affairs Blog) Subscribe: RSS | Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Castro | Stitcher | Deezer | Overcast
May 14, 2021
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3 Employers, 2 Wonks and 1 Health Insurance Mess (LIVE!)

In this special live episode, policy experts and employers debate the best way to improve the health insurance that 150 million Americans get through work. This session was part of “The Promise of Health Reform and a Public Option in a Biden Administration,” a virtual conference put on by the Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics at the University of Pennsylvania and United States of Care.Guests:Brian Blase, PhD, CEO, Blase Policy Strategies; Senior Fellow, Galen Institute; Senior Fellow, Foundation for Government AccountabilitySuzanne Delbanco, PhD, MPH, Executive Director, Catalyst for Payment ReformAllison Hoffman, JD, Professor of Law and LDI Senior Fellow, University of PennsylvaniaShaundell Newsome, Founder, Sumnu Marketing; Co-Chair, Small Business for America’s FutureSheila Savageau, U.S. Health Care Leader, General Motors (edited) Dig deeper into the research and tradeoffs of integrated care on our website: https://tradeoffs.org/2021/05/13/3-employers-2-wonks-and-1-health-insurance-mess/LISTEN BACK to our recent episode how what other employers are managing the cost of health care: https://tradeoffs.org/2021/02/18/the-high-price-of-lowering-health-costs/Sign up for our weekly newsletter to see what research health policy experts are reading right now, plus recommendations from our staff: bit.ly/tradeoffsnewsletterSupport this type of journalism today, with a gift: https://tradeoffs.org/donateFollow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tradeoffspod  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
May 13, 2021
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Breaking down how pharmacy deserts and access relate to health equity

Many think of pharmacies primarily as places to get prescription medications, but pharmacists are highly trained clinicals who offer other important health care services. Pharmacies are a valuable health care resource, and access to pharmacies may be an overlooked contributor to health inequities. Individuals who live in pharmacy deserts aren't able to easily obtain prescription medications or essential health care services. While the overall number of pharmacies in the US has increased gradually in recent years, research shows inequitable distribution of pharmacy and pharmacy closures.  On today's episode of A Health Podyssey, Jenny Guadamuz from the University of Southern California School of Pharmacy joins Health Affairs Editor-in-Chief Alan Weil to discuss her research published in the May 2021 edition of Health Affairs. Guadamuz and colleagues investigated the accessibility of pharmacies by neighborhood racial and ethnic composition in large US cities from 2007 to 2015. They found fewer pharmacies and more pharmacy closures located in predominantly black and Hispanic/Latino neighborhoods when compared with other neighborhoods. Listen to Health Affairs Editor-in-Chief Alan Weil interview Jenny Guadamuz discuss this foundational research on pharmacy access and how policies can encourage pharmacies to operate in pharmacy deserts.Subscribe: RSS | Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Google Podcasts
May 11, 2021
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The next wave of federal food aid for children and families

Listen to Health Affairs' Leslie Erdelack and Jessica Bylander discuss food insecurity and President Biden's latest efforts on federal food aid.
May 7, 2021
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Presenting The Dose: Asian Americans and the Dual Pandemic

Racism against people of Asian descent is not a new problem, but it’s been exacerbated lately by politicians using racist rhetoric to describe the coronavirus. Asians in America are now facing a dual pandemic: a heightened fear of racist abuse, from verbal slurs to physical assault, on top of all the anxiety of living through COVID-19. A conversation from our colleagues at The Dose.Guests:Vivian Shaw - a sociologist at Harvard UniversitySuzanna Park - PhD Candidate at Oregon State University in Global HealthMore information about eh AAPI COVID-19 project and other resources on our website: https://tradeoffs.org/2021/05/06/presenting-the-dose-asian-americans-and-the-dual-pandemic/Sign up for our weekly newsletter to see what research health policy experts are reading right now, plus recommendations from our staff: bit.ly/tradeoffsnewsletterSupport this type of journalism today, with a gift: https://tradeoffs.org/donateFollow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tradeoffspod  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
May 6, 2021
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Understanding private equity investment in hospitals

Listen to Health Affairs Editor-in-Chief Alan Weil interview Dr. Anaeze Offodile from the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center on the role of private equity investments in health care.
May 4, 2021
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Aggressive policing damages health equity and community health

Listen to Rob Lott talk with Dr. Hedwig Lee, author of a new Health Affairs Policy Brief on the impacts of aggressive policing on health and health equity.
April 30, 2021
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Public Option(al): What Happened to Biden's Big Idea?

Despite President Biden’s campaign promise to create a public option, the policy has been missing from his first 100 days in office. A handful of states, however, are forging ahead with public option legislation.Guests:Heather Howard, Princeton School of Public and International AffairsSabrina Corlette, JD, Georgetown UniversityDig deeper into the research and tradeoffs of integrated care on our website: https://tradeoffs.org/2021/04/29/public-option-what-happened-to-bidens-big-ideaSign up for our weekly newsletter to see what research health policy experts are reading right now, plus recommendations from our staff: bit.ly/tradeoffsnewsletterSupport this type of journalism today, with a gift: https://tradeoffs.org/donateFollow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tradeoffspod  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
April 29, 2021
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Should social risks factor into health care quality measures?

Listen to Health Affairs Editor-in-Chief Alan Weil interview David Nerenz from the Henry Ford Health System about social risk factors and their controversial inclusion as a measure of health care quality.
April 27, 2021
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#18 Save the Date for Orthopaedic Advocacy Week

AAOS President Daniel K. Guy, MD, FAAOS, extends a special invitation for members to participate in Orthopaedic Advocacy Week May 24-28, 2021. He explains how the new, completely virtual event is different from previous advocacy opportunities, what issues orthopaedic surgeons will raise with lawmakers, and why individual participation is “paramount” for amplifying year-long advocacy efforts on healthcare policy issues impacting musculoskeletal care. Learn more and sign up for the event. Hosted by: Kristen Coultas, AAOS Advocacy Communications Director and Cavan Jones, AAOS Government Relations Director
April 27, 2021
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Hospitals at large are failing at price transparency

Listen to Health Affairs' Leslie Erdelack and Rob Lott break down the latest on the federal hospital pricing transparency rule and hospital compliance.
April 23, 2021
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Preventing HIV Just Got A Lot Cheaper. What Took So Long?

After nearly a decade of sky-high prices, generics have sent the price of the HIV prevention drug PrEP plummeting. What kept it so expensive for so long, and will the price drop help us finally eradicate HIV?Guests:Robin Feldman, Professor of Law, UC Hastings; Director of the Center for InnovationTahir Amin, Co-Executive Director, I-MAKOni Blackstock, MD, Primary care and HIV physicianTim Horn, Director of Health Care Access, National Alliance of State and Territorial AIDS DirectorsCraig Garthwaite, Director of Health Care, Kellogg School of Management, Northwestern Univ.Dig deeper into the research and tradeoffs of prescription drug pricing on our website: https://tradeoffs.org/2021/04/22/preventing-hiv-just-got-a-lot-cheaper-what-took-so-long/Sign up for our weekly newsletter to see what research health policy experts are reading right now, plus recommendations from our staff: bit.ly/tradeoffsnewsletterSupport this type of journalism today, with a gift: https://tradeoffs.org/donateFollow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tradeoffspod  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
April 22, 2021
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ACA closed health coverage gaps for pregnant women. There’s still a long way to go

Listen to Editor-in-Chief Alan Weil interview Dr. Emily Johnston from the Health Policy Center at the Urban Institute. Johnston shares insights from her latest research on women’s loss of Medicaid in the weeks before or after pregnancy.
April 20, 2021
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What's the deal with hospital mergers?

Listen to Health Affairs' Jessica Bylander and Jeff Byers talk about the latest data on hospital mergers and why Microsoft is acquiring the health tech firm Nuance Communications.
April 16, 2021
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Losing a Hospital

More than 130 hospitals have closed in rural America over the last decade. Reporter Sarah Jane Tribble spent a year embedded in one small Kansas town as they dealt with their own hospital closure.Guest: Sarah Jane Tribble, Senior Correspondent, Kaiser Health NewsRead a transcript of this conversation: https://tradeoffs.org/2020/10/08/losing-a-hospital/Hear more of Sarah Jane's reporting about Fort Scott on the first season of Where It Hurts: whereithurts.showSign up for our weekly newsletter to see what research health policy experts are reading right now, plus recommendations from our staff: bit.ly/tradeoffsnewsletterFollow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tradeoffspod  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
April 15, 2021
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Urgent care centers cost more than you think

Listen to Health Affairs Editor-in-Chief Alan Weil interview University of Pennsylvania's Ari Friedman on his research that shows urgent care costs increased net health care spending.
April 13, 2021
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A renewed effort to address the opioid epidemic

It’s National Public Health Week, and HHS Secretary Xavier Becerra just renewed the agency’s emergency declaration for the opioid crisis. Listen to Senior Editor Leslie Erdelack and Health Equity Director Vabren Watts discuss why.
April 9, 2021
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Biden's $400 Billion Bet on Caring for Older and Disabled Americans at Home

President Biden wants to spend $400 billion to help older and disabled Americans get health care at home as part of his $2 trillion infrastructure proposal, a huge investment in an often neglected part of the health care system.Guests:Howard Gleckman, Senior Fellow, Urban InstituteRachel Werner, MD, PhD, Executive Director, Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics at the University of PennsylvaniaLearn more and read a full transcript of the episode: https://tradeoffs.org/2021/04/08/bidens-400-billion-bet-on-caring-for-older-and-disabled-americans-at-home/Sign up for our weekly newsletter to see what research health policy experts are reading right now, plus recommendations from our staff: bit.ly/tradeoffsnewsletterSupport this type of journalism today, with a gift: https://tradeoffs.org/donateFollow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tradeoffspod  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
April 8, 2021
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The ACA led to an increase in the contraceptive-curious

Listen to Alan Weil interview Dr. Nora Becker from the University of Michigan on the affordability of long-acting reversible contraceptives, how the Affordable Care Act impacted the costs associated with such devices, and the role of behavioral economics in choosing a health plan.
April 6, 2021
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Drug pricing on the agenda for massive infrastructure bill

Listen to Chris Fleming and Washington University's Rachel Sachs break down H.R. 3, which contains a series of far-reaching drug pricing reforms that could be included as part of a massive infrastructure package proposal.
April 2, 2021
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A New Era of Gun Violence Research

As gun violence surges, researchers are using new federal funding to search for solutions.Emmy Betz, MD, MPH, Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine and Director of the Firearm Injury Prevention Initiative, University of ColoradoJonathan Jay, DrPH, JD, Assistant Professor of Community Health Sciences, Boston UniversityAutumn Parkin, gun owner and advocateIf you or someone you know is having suicidal ideation, please call the Suicide Prevention Hotline: 800 273 8255For more information about gun violence research visit our website: https://tradeoffs.org/2021/04/01/a-new-era-of-gun-violence-research/Sign up for our weekly newsletter to see what research health policy experts are reading right now, plus recommendations from our staff: bit.ly/tradeoffsnewsletterSupport this type of journalism today, with a gift: https://tradeoffs.org/donateFollow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tradeoffspod  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
April 1, 2021
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Nursing homes have a staff turnover crisis – even before COVID-19

Listen to Alan Weil interview David Grabowski, a professor of health care policy at Harvard Medical School, on nursing home staff turnover and its implications for quality of care.
March 30, 2021
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#17 Policy in Practice: Threats to Orthopaedics in 2021

Prior authorization paperwork, insurance battles over setting of care, and EHR documentation challenges are just a few of the many ways that government policies can stand in the way of patient care. In this episode with new AAOS Advocacy Council Chair Douglas W. Lundy, MD, MBA, FAAOS, we discuss the threats we’re fighting in 2021 and how these rules and regulations impact orthopaedic surgery from Capitol Hill to the operating room. Learn more at AAOS. Hosted by: Kristen Coultas, AAOS Advocacy Communications Director
March 30, 2021
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Cultivating Health Coaching with Marina Borukhovich After receiving her breast cancer diagnosis, our next guest made it her mission to help others by earning her health coaching certification, which guided her to discover an opportunity to innovate in the increasingly important field of health coaching.