Newsletter
Leading and Protecting Our Children with Guest Dr. Joelle Simpson

Women Physicians Lead

Leading and Protecting Our Children with Guest Dr. Joelle Simpson

My guest Dr. Joelle Simpson, MD, MPH, is the Division Chief of the Emergency Medicine Department at Children’s National Hospital in Washington D.C. She is also the Medical Director for…
February 11, 2022

Leading and Protecting Our Children with Guest Dr. Joelle Simpson

My guest Dr. Joelle Simpson, MD, MPH, is the Division Chief of the Emergency Medicine Department at Children’s National Hospital in Washington D.C. She is also the Medical Director for Emergency Preparedness at Children’s National Health System. In this role, Joelle provides strategic leadership for Children’s National’s disaster preparedness, response, and community outreach efforts. She is the Program Director for the Emergency Medical Services for Children (EMSC) State Partnership program in Washington DC working on a current national project to improve the “pediatric readiness” of local emergency departments. She is also an appointed member of the DC Mayor’s Emergency Medical Services Advisory Council for DC serving as a pediatric advocate in the development of prehospital policies and protocols.

Dr. Simpson also founded the Pediatric Medical Reserve Corp of DC which provides specialized pediatric support services to the DC community in preparation for, response to, and recovery from disaster, pandemic, and mass-casualty events involving children and families. On a regional level, she participates in the National Capital Region planning for pediatric surge and disaster response. Locally, she represents Children’s National at the DC Department of Health – Health and Medical Coalition which coordinates multiple agencies and organizations around emergency preparedness for Washington DC. She serves on the pediatric emergency medicine and disaster committees for the American Academy of Pediatrics and the American College of Emergency Physicians.

She received the ‘Washington Woman of Excellence’ 2021 Award where she was recognized for various roles, including her leadership and significant accomplishments as medical director for Emergency Preparedness at Children’s National; her work as an Emergency Department physician leading the D.C. Pediatric Medical Reserves Corps; and for her expertise and leadership in impacting the outcomes for children and the community during the COVID-19 health emergency.

In this episode we talk about:

Thinking about your career and leadership journey who or what may have been instrumental in that decision?

What does a day as a women physician on the frontlines look like and what challenges do you face?

Define for us what self-care means to you and what self-care looks like when it comes to being a woman on the front lines during this pandemic?

Why is diversity in leadership as it pertains to having more women physicians vital to healthcare?

When we look at the pandemic and how the lid has been lifted and exposed in healthcare ad workplace disparities, how would the ability to retain women in healthcare leadership diversity help reduce those disparities and improve care?

What has been your experience with someone who is hesitant about getting vaccinated? What would you like to share about the importance of talking about this?

What do you want people to know about this pandemic and how we can all move forward to a safer and healthy environment?

If you’re ready to transition into a leadership role and need support during your career journey join us on Facebook www.leadingladiesincharge.com

If you are a women physician leader and looking to join a group of high-performing leaders and up-level your career, join our Physicians Rising Up Leadership Circle Mastermind. Learn more here at www.physiciansrisingup.com

Follow Dr. Joelle Simpson

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/joelle-simpson-md-mph-611b91a/

You may also like

Top Health Podcasts. Delivered to Your Inbox and Eardrums.

Join Our Newsletter

Proudly supported by:

cover
How is Parkinson’s Disease Diagnosed? And How Is a Care Team Created? Parkinson’s disease can’t be diagnosed through a simple blood test or scan. After a referral from a primary care doctor, it often takes visits to a neurologist or movement disorder specialist before receiving a clinical diagnosis.