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Emotional eating: Why you always want food

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Emotional eating: Why you always want food

"I’ve consistently found that most of the doctors who want coaching help feel like I did when I struggled with my weight: They weren’t feeling like their lives were completely…
October 15, 2022

Emotional eating: Why you always want food

“I’ve consistently found that most of the doctors who want coaching help feel like I did when I struggled with my weight: They weren’t feeling like their lives were completely out of control or their problems were insurmountable. It wasn’t like the TV trope, wherein a woman turns to food because she’s alone and miserable and rejected by society—for the most part, the women who come to me for help losing weight aren’t clinically depressed or struggling to function normally in their lives. But they are stressed. They are dealing with a regular array of real-life challenges. They’re turning to food to suppress and neutralize their emotions. And many of them can point to specific causes of their weight struggle, or reasons they haven’t yet been successful in reaching their goals.”

Katrina Ubell is a pediatrician and author of How to Lose Weight for the Last Time: Brain-Based Solutions for Permanent Weight Loss.

She shares her story and discusses her KevinMD article, “Emotional eating: Why you always want food.”

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