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Boundaries for women physicians

The Podcast by KevinMD

Boundaries for women physicians

"I learned the hard way what can happen when physicians—especially women physicians—lack personal boundaries. Before hitting my low point, I had no boundaries. I had been raised to give, give,…
October 19, 2022

Boundaries for women physicians

“I learned the hard way what can happen when physicians—especially women physicians—lack personal boundaries. Before hitting my low point, I had no boundaries. I had been raised to give, give, give, and, when times became tough, to give more by working harder. In medical school and training, we were taught to not have boundaries, but rather to do everything in the service of our patients who should always come first. Now I realize that we physicians must put ourselves first. We are hurting ourselves—and doing a disservice to our patients, colleagues, and families—when we put everyone and everything else before our own needs. After all, we are our most precious resource and must use that resource in the best way possible.”

Tammie Chang is a pediatric hematology-oncology physician and co-founder, Pink Coat, MD. She can be reached on Instagram @tammiechangmd and at her self-titled site, Tammie Chang, MD.

She shares her story and discusses her KevinMD article, “Boundaries for women physicians.”

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