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An obstetrician recommends midwifery care

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An obstetrician recommends midwifery care

"By denigrating midwifery care, pathologizing the natural process of birth, and instilling fear of complications and pain, doctors persuaded women to give birth at the hospital under their care. By…
December 9, 2021

An obstetrician recommends midwifery care

“By denigrating midwifery care, pathologizing the natural process of birth, and instilling fear of complications and pain, doctors persuaded women to give birth at the hospital under their care. By touting the benefits of anesthesia, forceps delivery, episiotomy and promoting in-hospital birth, doctors and hospitals were able to capitalize on the new specialty.

Interventions of increasing risk and complexity, and their routine use — without proof of benefits for the 80 percent of birthing people who are low risk — have caused harm not just because of their invasive nature, but because the birthing person is subjected to various forms of persuasion and coercion (without informed consent) to do what doctors believe is best for them and their babies. Many of the practices employed on labor and delivery interfere with the natural process of birth. When patients ask to avoid those interventions (which often make life easier for the staff or more money for the hospital), they are told they are not allowed to do what they want for their labor and birth. In a 2019 survey of women who gave birth in U.S. hospitals, 28 percent reported mistreatment. Black people report discrimination in about one-third of their medical encounters.”

Leslie Farrington is an obstetrician-gynecologist.

She shares her story and discusses her KevinMD article, “This obstetrician recommends midwifery care.” (https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/2021/07/this-obstetrician-recommends-midwifery-care.html)

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