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How to Approach Challenging Patient Interactions With Greater Ease EP78

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How to Approach Challenging Patient Interactions With Greater Ease EP78

Sept 28, 2020 Join me over a cup of green tea as I chat with you about ways in which you can approach complicated patient interactions with greater ease. 1)…
September 28, 2020

How to Approach Challenging Patient Interactions With Greater Ease EP78

Sept 28, 2020

Join me over a cup of green tea as I chat with you about ways in which you can approach complicated patient interactions with greater ease.

1) Confirm what your patient knows about their medical situation and condition.

2) Be empathetic and choose compassionate solutions that serve your patient best in that moment.

3) Tailor communication in such a way that is clearly understood by your patient. It is okay to rephrase things differently to achieve mutual understanding.

4) Be transparent about what you know as of present with respect to progress & status and offer hope of comfort, progression, or prevention of decline.

5) Ensure your patient/caregiver feels empowered as part of the decision-making process. There is generally always another provider or more who is involved and so, ensuring follow-up if warranted is something you can help to facilitate.

Resources:

www.jennifergeorge.co

ReadCommunication is Care: 9 Empowering Strategies to Guide Patient Healing (https://www.amazon.ca/Communication-Care-Empowering-Strategies-Patient-ebook/dp/B07TDSHZXT)

Host Social:

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