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Reducing Medical Supply Chain Vulnerability: Now You See It, Now You Don’t

Mayo Clinic Talks

Reducing Medical Supply Chain Vulnerability: Now You See It, Now You Don’t

Guest: Pritish K. Tosh, M.D. (@DrPritishTosh) Host: Darryl S. Chutka, M.D. (@chutkaMD) The COVID-19 pandemic exposed the vulnerability of the medical product supply chain and its impact on providing optimal…
November 1, 2022

Reducing Medical Supply Chain Vulnerability: Now You See It, Now You Don’t

Guest: Pritish K. Tosh, M.D. (@DrPritishTosh)

Host: Darryl S. Chutka, M.D. (@chutkaMD)

The COVID-19 pandemic exposed the vulnerability of the medical product supply chain and its impact on providing optimal healthcare. The spread of the disease was accompanied by not only shortages of personal protective equipment but also medications and many other products we depend on every day in our clinical practice. We’ve learned that we cannot provide adequate or timely health care when there are shortages of important products. As a result, the health of our patients and healthcare providers has been endangered. It’s also resulted in a rationing of care and an increased risk of error as we’re forced to use sub-standard or replacement products. It’s caused us to look for new solutions to reduce our medical supply chain vulnerabilities. Our guest for this podcast is Pritish K. Tosh, M.D., an infectious disease specialist at the Mayo Clinic.

Connect with the Mayo Clinic’s School of Continuous Professional Development online at https://ce.mayo.edu/ or on Twitter @MayoMedEd

Twitter Handles:

(@chutkaMD); https://twitter.com/ChutkaMD 

(@DrPritishTosh); https://twitter.com/drpritishtosh

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