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Primary Care Management of the Post-Prostate Cancer Patient

Mayo Clinic Talks

Primary Care Management of the Post-Prostate Cancer Patient

Guest: Matthew K. Tollefson, M.D. (@MattTollefsonMD) Host: Darryl S. Chutka, M.D. (@ChutkaMD) Other than skin cancer, prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men in the United States and…
June 29, 2021

Primary Care Management of the Post-Prostate Cancer Patient

Guest: Matthew K. Tollefson, M.D. (@MattTollefsonMD)

Host: Darryl S. Chutka, M.D. (@ChutkaMD)

Other than skin cancer, prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men in the United States and will affect 1 in every 6 men 65 years and older. Fortunately, when detected early, it is very treatable. Long-term follow-up of patients with treated prostate cancer is usually performed by primary care providers. How often should these patients be seen? How much of an exam is recommended? Which tests should be ordered? When are imaging tests indicated and which studies are the most helpful? This podcast will address these questions and more as we discuss the primary care management of the post-prostate cancer patient with Dr. Matthew Tollefson, a urologist from the Mayo Clinic.

Specific topics discussed:

  • Current treatment options for prostate cancer
  • Determinants for choosing one of the treatment options for prostate cancer
  • When and how often patients should receive follow-up for prostate cancer
  • Laboratory tests recommended for the follow-up of prostate cancer patients
  • When a detectable PSA is concerning following prostate cancer treatment
  • Imaging studies recommended for following prostate cancer patients and when they are indicated
  • Treatment options for recurrent prostate cancer
  • Future treatment options for prostate cancer which have potential

Additional resources:

Connect with the Mayo Clinic’s School of Continuous Professional Development online at https://ce.mayo.edu/ or on Twitter @MayoMedEd.

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