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Can Nutritional Supplements Turn You into an All-Star?

Mayo Clinic Talks

Can Nutritional Supplements Turn You into an All-Star?

Guest: Andrew Jagim, Ph.D. (@AJagim)Host: Darryl S. Chutka, M.D. (@ChutkaMD) Billions of dollars per year are spent in the U.S. on nutritional supplements to enhance performance. Multiple nutritional supplements are commercially…
January 5, 2021

Can Nutritional Supplements Turn You into an All-Star?

Guest: Andrew Jagim, Ph.D. (@AJagim)

Host: Darryl S. Chutka, M.D. (@ChutkaMD

Billions of dollars per year are spent in the U.S. on nutritional supplements to enhance performance. Multiple nutritional supplements are commercially available and are marketed for enhancing endurance, building muscle strength, improving exercise efficiency, and decreasing the potential for injury. Do these supplements actually deliver the benefits they claim? Are they safe? What age athletes are taking these supplements?  We’ll discuss these topics and more with Dr. Andrew Jagim, the director of sports medicine research at the Mayo Clinic.

Specific topics:

  • Recommended approach to the athlete who wants to improve their performance
  • Potential benefits of nutritional supplements for athlete’s
  • Age of athletes taking nutritional supplements
  • Selecting a high-quality nutritional supplement
  • Reliable web sites reviewing the available nutritional supplements including potential benefits and safety
  • Review of commonly taken nutritional supplements
  • Nutritional supplements which have potential harm

Additional Resources:

Connect with the Mayo Clinic’s School of Continuous Professional Development online at https://ce.mayo.edu/ or on Twitter @MayoMedEd.

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