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DOCSF22: DOCSF Science-Sensors and AR/VR in Orthopaedics

DOCSF – Digital Orthopaedics Conference San Francisco

DOCSF22: DOCSF Science-Sensors and AR/VR in Orthopaedics

October 18, 2022

DOCSF22: DOCSF Science-Sensors and AR/VR in Orthopaedics

In this episode, Fabrizio Billi, Scientific Director at DocSF, and Lee Grossman, CEO at OREF, moderate a discussion around six papers on sensors, extended reality, virtual reality, and augmented reality in orthopedics. 

In the module about sensors, they welcomed Jeffrey Lotz, Vice Chair of Research in Orthopedic Surgery at UCSF, and Cory Calendine, an orthopedic surgeon, where they review three papers on electronics being used as diagnostic and therapeutic tools, stretchable and suitable fiber sensors for wireless monitoring of connective tissue strains, and sensor-embedded fracture plates to quantify fracture healing. For them, this technology has still a long way to come but will be passively delivering data insights effectively.

During the second module, discussing the papers about XR, VR, and AR, Fabrizio and Lee are joined by Sigurd Berven, Chief of Spine Service at UCLA, and Louis Rosenberg, CEO at Unanimous AI. The four of them also discuss three papers about trauma patient care simulation that uses extended reality technology in a hybrid emergency room, clinical accuracy through augmented reality, and orthopedic navigation by an AR platform. Even though this seems to be where this XR/VR/AR technology is heading, they all agree that the accuracy is compromised sometimes, and there is space for improvement.

Listen to this episode for two very interesting modules on how sensors, extended, virtual, and augmented reality are being developed to assist orthopedic patients and doctors!

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