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Episode 77: Rural Health Policy & Advocacy

Rural Health Rising

Episode 77: Rural Health Policy & Advocacy

Rural hospitals and healthcare providers are constantly facing new challenges as the healthcare industry changes and as regulations shift.
October 13, 2022

Episode 77: Rural Health Policy & Advocacy

Rural hospitals and healthcare providers are constantly facing new challenges as the healthcare industry changes and as regulations shift. At the same time, legislators and federal agencies need to hear from rural hospitals if any new action needs to be taken for their benefit or if coming changes will impact them.

Our guest today is Carrie Cochran-McClain, Chief Policy Officer for the National Rural Health Association. 

Make your voice heard to promote NRHA’s rural health FY 2023 Appropriations requests and priorities including extension of LVH/MDH hospitals, rural ambulance payments, 340B protections, telehealth provisions, and sequestration relief. NRHA has developed pre-prepared materials and talking points as guides for these conversations.

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Audio Engineering & Original Music by Kenji Ulmer

https://www.kenjiulmer.com/

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