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Journals and Professional Associations Podcasts

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Top Stories for 3/5

Medical groups urge racial data collection efforts for COVID-19 vaccinations; Apple and the University of Michigan share first results from hearing study. Also: Merck and Johnson & Johnson partner with the federal government to ramp up vaccine manufacturing.Links to the stories:Medical groups urge racial data collection efforts for COVID-19 vaccinationsApple, University of Michigan share first results from Apple Hearing StudyMerck to open facilities to Johnson & Johnson for speedier COVID-19 vaccine production
March 5, 2021
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Using data to work toward telehealth equity — with Dr. Lauren Eberly and Dr. Srinath Adusumalli

We know that telehealth can be a tremendous opportunity to expand healthcare access for people who might face barriers to medical services. But it also may be replicating the digital divide.In a recent study, researchers examined data from nearly 150,000 unique patients who scheduled telemedicine visits from March 16 to May 11, 2020. They investigated who completed those visits, and how. Two of those researchers, Dr. Lauren Eberly, a fellow in cardiovascular medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, and Dr. Srinath Adusumalli, assistant chief medical information officer for connected health and assistant professor of clinical medicine, cardiovascular at Penn Medicine, joined MobiHealthNews Managing Editor Laura Lovett and Healthcare IT News Senior Editor Kat Jercich to discuss their findings and the importance of centering equity in virtual care.Talking points:Structural inequities are pervasive, and the digital divide is realPatients of color have lower rates of access to broadband and digital connectivityIn this study, older patients, Asian patients, Medicaid users and non-English speakers were less likely to complete telehealth visitsIt’s important to meet patients where they’re at and to meet their clinical needsThere are many opportunities for telehealth outside of rural careIt's a matter of population health as well – and we have to get it right sooner rather than laterThis is the chance to rethink strategies to deliver careVendors should incorporate equity into their designLaying a stronger foundation for reimbursement of care —especially payment parity—would be helpful to safeguard careBroadband access will also be keyMore about this episode:Women are less likely to use video for telehealth careStudy: Black patients more likely than white patients to use telehealth because of pandemicTelehealth may worsen digital divide for people with disabilitiesTelehealth's digital divide is real, and members of Congress want to address itHims & Hers, ATA, and 10 others launch Telehealth Equity Coalition
March 5, 2021
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NEJM This Week — March 4, 2021

Featuring articles on baricitinib plus remdesivir for adults with Covid-19, albumin infusions in patients with cirrhosis, a trial of terlipressin for hepatorenal syndrome, nivolumab plus cabozantinib in renal-cell carcinoma, and on misrepresenting race; a review article on diffuse large B-cell lymphoma; a Clinical Problem-Solving describing a treacherous course; and Perspective articles on conquering atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, on reform of payment for primary care, and on being without sanctuary. Supplement to the New England Journal of Medicine, Vol. 384, No. 9.
March 3, 2021
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Blinatumomab for B-cell ALL Relapse, IVIG for MIS-C, Review of Irritable Bowel Syndrome, and more

Editor's Summary by Mary McDermott, MD, Deputy Editor of JAMA, the Journal of the American Medical Association, for the March 2, 2021 issue
March 2, 2021
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Top Stories for 2/26

In today's Top Stories with Jeff Lagasse: Operating margins and other hospital metrics are struggling to recover from a winter COVID-19 surge; HHS pick Becerra praises telehealth. Plus: Google launches CareStudio to tackle EHR navigation issues.Links to the stories:U.S. hospitals and health systems face a long road to recoveryHHS Secretary nominee Xavier Becerra signals support for virtual careGoogle rolls out EHR navigation tool Care Studio
February 26, 2021
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Health equity, caregiver diversity, and COVID-19

HIMSSCast host Jonah Comstock welcomes Sheldon Fields, RN, PhD, a researcher, health policy analyst, educator and advocate. He serves as Associate Dean for Equity and Inclusion at Penn State, First Vice President at the National Black Nurses Association, and founder and CEO of his own consulting firm, the SDF Group. On today's episode, they talk about some of the current health equity challenges brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic and how to combat them. Talking points:Dr. Fields' history as a nurse and academicThe mission of the National Black Nurses’ AssociationHow caregiver representation aligns with care equityComparing the COVID-19 pandemic with the HIV/AIDS epidemicHow pandemics can illuminate health disparitiesThe history of medical atrocities in the US, and its aftereffectsIs vaccine hesitancy as big an issue as vaccine access?How minority nursing associations can help expand vaccine accessHealth equity beyond the pandemic — including medical researchHow the NIH’s All of Us initiative has continued throughout the pandemicMore about this article:Nurses You Should KnowThe National Black Nurses AssociationDr. Fields' PSU Faculty PageAll of UsIn-depth: Health organizations harness the power of technology to address health disparities during pandemicAMA past president Dr. Patrice Harris advocates for equity in the COVID-19 eraAI bias may worsen COVID-19 health disparities for people of colorNIH All of Us program gearing up for 'precision engagement,' Eric Dishman saysHuman rights law can provide a fair, transparent framework for vaccine allocationsDisadvantaged census areas are linked to COVID-19 incidenceCVS Health, Lyft and YMCA team for equitable access to a COVID-19 vaccination siteBig tech, digital health coalition forms to undercut COVID-19 healthcare disparitiesCalifornia taps Blue Shield to oversee an equitable vaccine distribution plan
February 25, 2021
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Health equity, caregiver diversity, and COVID-19 — with Sheldon Fields

HIMSSCast host Jonah Comstock welcomes Sheldon Fields, RN, PhD, a researcher, health policy analyst, educator and advocate. He serves as Associate Dean for Equity and Inclusion at Penn State, First Vice President at the National Black Nurses Association, and founder and CEO of his own consulting firm, the SDF Group. On today's episode, they talk about some of the current health equity challenges brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic and how to combat them. Talking points:Dr. Fields' history as a nurse and academicThe mission of the National Black Nurses’ AssociationHow caregiver representation aligns with care equityComparing the COVID-19 pandemic with the HIV/AIDS epidemicHow pandemics can illuminate health disparitiesThe history of medical atrocities in the US, and its aftereffectsIs vaccine hesitancy as big an issue as vaccine access?How minority nursing associations can help expand vaccine accessHealth equity beyond the pandemic — including medical researchHow the NIH’s All of Us initiative has continued throughout the pandemicMore about this article:Nurses You Should KnowThe National Black Nurses AssociationDr. Fields' PSU Faculty PageAll of UsIn-depth: Health organizations harness the power of technology to address health disparities during pandemicAMA past president Dr. Patrice Harris advocates for equity in the COVID-19 eraAI bias may worsen COVID-19 health disparities for people of colorNIH All of Us program gearing up for 'precision engagement,' Eric Dishman saysHuman rights law can provide a fair, transparent framework for vaccine allocationsDisadvantaged census areas are linked to COVID-19 incidenceCVS Health, Lyft and YMCA team for equitable access to a COVID-19 vaccination siteBig tech, digital health coalition forms to undercut COVID-19 healthcare disparitiesCalifornia taps Blue Shield to oversee an equitable vaccine distribution plan
February 25, 2021
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NEJM This Week — February 25, 2021

Featuring articles on dexamethasone treatment in Covid-19, BCMA-specific CAR T cells in refractory myeloma, a cholinergic agonist and peripheral antagonist for schizophrenia, the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation at 10 years, inflammation in ALS, and how structural racism works; a review article on β-thalassemias; a case report of a man with eye pain and decreased vision; and Perspective articles on last-mile logistics of Covid-19 vaccination, on telemedicine and medical licensure, and on the inequity of isolation. Supplement to the New England Journal of Medicine, Vol. 384, No. 8.
February 24, 2021
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The Awful, No Good, Very Bad Employee: New Book on The Problem Employee

In this podcast episode, Mike Sacopulos interviews Laura Hills, D.A.  Dr. Hills is well known for her programs, books, and articles, and notably, has been the staff development columnist for The Journal of Medical Practice Management since 1998.  Her newest book is, The Problem Employee:  How to Manage the Employees No One Wants to Manage. Dr. Hills says, “Wouldn’t it be great if you never had a problem employee? But we must be realistic. If human beings are involved, there will be problems.”  Many healthcare executives find the task of managing problem employees to be challenging, time-consuming, and a vexing test of their leadership ability and patience.  As you will hear in this interview, Laura Hills describes the choices that healthcare leaders must make:  To respond emotionally to the problem employee, or to respond strategically. Designed specifically for healthcare executives, The Problem Employee, presents complete, clear, how-to-do-it strategies for managing problem employees and delves into 17 of the most challenging and diabolical problem employees that healthcare leaders are likely to encounter.  This is the book healthcare executives will need whether they find themselves supervising a toxic, untrustworthy, pessimistic, burned out, lazy, overworked, cliquish, or childish employee -- or whether they manage a prima donna, a drama queen, a bully, a gossip, or even a slob. [email protected] www.bluepencilinstitute.comhttps://www.linkedin.com/in/dr-laura-hills-7362b410/https://twitter.com/DrLauraHills  
February 24, 2021
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Baclofen for ICU Alcohol Withdrawal, Vitamin C and Thiamine for Sepsis, Multiple Sclerosis Review, and more

Editor's Summary by Howard Bauchner, MD, Editor in Chief of JAMA, the Journal of the American Medical Association, for the February 23, 2021 issue
February 23, 2021
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Top Stories for 2/19

In today's Top Stories with Jeff Lagasse: Online platform ClassPass unveils a new COVID-19 vaccine locator, while New Jersey struggles with its Microsoft-powered vaccine registration portal. Plus: Insurers are feeling the financial effects of the pandemic.Links to the stories:ClassPass adds COVID-19 vaccine search feature to its platformNew Jersey blames Microsoft for weeks of vaccine rollout glitchesFourth quarter COVID-19 costs catch up to insurers
February 19, 2021
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How North Dakota's immunization database is supporting its COVID-19 vaccine rollout

With a small population distributed over a large geographical area, North Dakota doesn't lend itself to the easiest vaccine rollout. But the state has a secret weapon: a robust database called the North Dakota Immunization Information System (NDIIS). NDIIS manager Mary Woinarowicz joins host Jonah Comstock to talk about the early days of the COVID rollout, and how having a robust data management system has helped the state to make the most of its allocated COVID-19 vaccine doses. Talking points: The NDIIS and its pre-COVID functionHow NDIIS is supporting the COVID-19 vaccine rolloutLogistical challenges to vaccine administration, especially in rural areasThe challenges of launching a state-level response that’s part of a national rolloutHow NDIIS has responded to strong vaccine demandPatient-facing tools to improve the vaccine rolloutAdditional challenges related to the second doseThe NDIIS’s Immunization Forecasting toolThe slip in non-COVID vaccination during the pandemicWhat still lies ahead for COVID-19 vaccinationShould people who have had COVID get the vaccine?How to decide which vaccine patients get which vaccineMore about this episode:NDIISAthenahealth developer creates COVID-19 vaccine website from maternity leaveHow patient engagement tools can help ensure 2nd COVID-19 vaccine dosesHow top EHR vendors are prepping their systems for COVID-19 vaccinesEpic, Cerner offer updates on COVID-19 vaccine rollout effortsAI has advantages for COVID-19 vaccine rollout, but potential dangers tooHealthcare Finance News' latest updates on the COVID-19 vaccine distributionCalifornia taps Blue Shield to oversee an equitable vaccine distribution planHospitals need vaccine supply predictability 'all the way to the loading docks' 6,500 pharmacies to get 1 million doses of COVID-19  vaccineApple requires COVID-19 vaccine passport developers to work with public health authoritiesGoogle adds feature to help users find COVID-19 vaccination sitesGoogle Cloud launches vaccine distribution tool for local governments
February 19, 2021
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NEJM This Week — February 18, 2021

Featuring articles on a C5a receptor inhibitor for ANCA vasculitis, convalescent plasma in Covid-19, relugolix combination therapy for uterine fibroid symptoms, and promoting Covid-19 vaccination in the United States; a review article on maintaining safety with SARS-CoV-2 vaccines; a case report of a man with delirium and renal insufficiency; and Perspective articles on vaccinating children against Covid-19 and on the FDA’s experience with Covid-19 antibody tests. Supplement to the New England Journal of Medicine, Vol. 384, No. 7.
February 17, 2021
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Monoclonal Antibodies for COVID-19, Strength Training for Knee OA, Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Review, and more

Editor's Summary by Howard Bauchner, MD, Editor in Chief of JAMA, the Journal of the American Medical Association, for the February 16, 2021 issue
February 16, 2021
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Top Stories for 2/12

In today's Top Stories with Jeff Lagasse:  Best practices for weathering the COVID-19 pandemic are emerging among hospital CEOs, while reimbursement restrictions for telehealth have been removed at a rapid pace. Plus: Fitbit introduces blood glucose monitoring.Links to the stories:The top 10 things CEOs got right during the pandemicReport shows 'vast improvement' in state telehealth reimbursement policiesFitbit adds blood glucose tracking to its connected app
February 12, 2021
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Dr. Peter Hotez on COVID-19 (Bonus SoundPractice Episode)

Peter Hotez MD Ph.D. is professor of pediatrics and molecular virology at Baylor College of Medicine, where he is also co-director of the Texas Children’s Center for Vaccine Development and Endowed Chair in Tropical Pediatrics. He is a vaccine scientist who led the development of vaccines to prevent and treat neglected tropical diseases and coronavirus infections. Mike Sacopulos interviews Dr. Hotez on his recommendations as we emerge from the COVID-19 “Eye of the Storm,” a discussion on emerging variants and vaccine development status, and the critical situation of vaccine hesitancy among physicians and healthcare workers.  He also registers an alarm on the disparities of the vaccine rollout – both in vaccine hesitancy and vaccine unavailability in minority groups.  He goes on to describe the targeting of minority groups by anti-vaccine messaging and the role of social media (and other organizations) in that effort. Finally, Peter Hotez provides talking points for physician leaders on understanding their role during this pandemic, the importance of recognizing the enormous pressures that physicians and healthcare workers are facing – emotional, mental, and physical – and how physician executives and leaders can help.  https://jhupbooks.press.jhu.edu/title/preventing-next-pandemic [email protected] @PeterHotez  
February 12, 2021
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How the healthcare system fails patients, and how it can do better — with Matthew Zachary

Matthew Zachary — cancer survivor, patient advocate, influencer, pianist, and podcast DJ — joins host Jonah Comstock to tell his story and break down his patient's-eye view of the healthcare system and what needs to change for it to serve its consumers better. In a wide-ranging conversation with Matthew's irreverent style, they address topics like patient experience, financial incentives, socio-economic disparities, and more.This podcast is brought to you by RingCentral.Talking points:Matthew’s patient storyPatient advocacy in a nutshellThe beginnings of the modern patient-centered movement and the founding of Stupid CancerChallenges in today’s healthcare systemWhat can healthcare stakeholders do to make life better for patients?Aligning monetary incentives with patient needs and experiencesClinical trial databases as an example of profits over patientsThe challenge of bringing good care to minority and underserved groupsThe gaps between innovation, adoption, and patient awarenessMore about this podcast:A more active role for consumers will decelerate health spending over the next two decadesThe role of health systems in empowering communities3 patient experience trends that IT leaders should act onFocus on Health Equity (our new collection page)The Stupid Cancer Show (Matthew's previous podcast)Out of Patients (Matthew's current podcast)
February 11, 2021
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NEJM This Week — February 11, 2021

Featuring articles on repurposed antiviral drugs for Covid-19, a tirbanibulin ointment for actinic keratosis, a vestibular implant for bilateral vestibular hypofunction, antibodies and SARS-CoV-2 infection in health workers, a randomized trial of an HCV vaccine regimen, and regulatory T cells in multiple sclerosis; a review article on circadian mechanisms in medicine; a case report of a woman with dyspnea on exertion and abnormal findings on chest imaging; and Perspective articles on the future of drug-pricing transparency, on a shared evaluation platform for medical training, and on lessons from the Irish wake. Supplement to the New England Journal of Medicine, Vol. 384, No. 6.
February 10, 2021
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Successful Hiring, Onboarding, and Retention of Physicians

Susan Quirk s a Managing Director with Three-Sixty Advisory Group and has more than 25-years of experience partnering across healthcare organizations to improve key metrics by overcoming a myriad of issues related to engagement, productivity, recruitment, retention, and patient experience from the C-suite to the front line.  In this practical podcast interview, Susan Quirk flags the most common mistakes that organizations make when onboarding (or not onboarding) physicians, the importance of fit of the physician in both company structure and strategy, the list of reasons why physicians leave organizations, and the importance of peer mentors.  Her formula to minimize the involuntary turnover of physicians is important for all physician leaders to hear. Susan Quirk is Managing Director at Three - Sixty Advisory [email protected]  
February 10, 2021
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Exercise Training for HFpEF, Blood Transfusion for AMI and Anemia, Review of Hip and Knee OA, and more

Editor's Summary by Howard Bauchner, MD, Editor in Chief of JAMA, the Journal of the American Medical Association, for the February 9, 2021 issue
February 9, 2021
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Top Stories for 2/5

In today's Top Stories with Jeff Lagasse: Google Cloud joins the national COVID-19 vaccination effort with a new tool, while the feds plan on additional doses. Plus: A security breach at a New York health system.Links to the stories:Google Cloud launches vaccine distribution tool for local governmentsOne million COVID-19 vaccine doses are going to 6,500 pharmaciesEHR snooping at Montefiore leads to security breach
February 5, 2021
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Virtual care: The next frontier in telehealth — with Sean Duffy and Chris Hogg

Omada CEO Sean Duffy and Chris Hogg, former COO at Propeller Health, join host Jonah Comstock to talk about virtual care, remote chronic condition management, and just what healthcare will look like into the next decade. Talking points:What is virtual care?Virtual care in a post-COVID telehealth landscapeAdoption curves: virtual visits vs virtual careMulti-modal provider-patient communicationWhen the adoption curve lags against the innovation curveWhat’s the product? the transition from hardware to software to experienceUsing a jobs-to-be-done framework for healthcareHow to integrate virtual care with traditional brick-and-mortar careFitting virtual care into a patient-centric care ecosystemThe changing concept of primary careWhat virtual care companies have to offer for telemedicine (Sean’s non-answer on American Well)The role of Amazon, Walmart, and other big players in the new provider ecosystemHow traditional providers are reacting to the changing marketLooking aheadMore about this episode:https://www.mobihealthnews.com/news/after-covid-19-telehealths-momentum-will-be-sustained-younger-consumers-seeking-conveniencehttps://www.mobihealthnews.com/news/omada-reports-blood-sugar-weight-improvements-after-12-months-its-digital-diabetes-preventionhttps://www.mobihealthnews.com/news/omada-health-acquires-physera-adds-virtual-msk-therapy-its-chronic-care-programshttps://www.mobihealthnews.com/news/amazon-furthers-foothold-digital-pharmacies-launch-amazon-pharmacy-storehttps://www.mobihealthnews.com/news/amazon-releases-wearable-health-tracker-app-called-amazon-halohttps://www.mobihealthnews.com/news/walmart-snaps-digital-health-company-carezones-medication-management-toolhttps://www.mobihealthnews.com/news/north-america/propellers-pharmacy-app-now-connects-users-cvs-walmart-kroger-rite-aidhttps://www.mobihealthnews.com/news/amwell-ceo-looks-back-year-unprecedented-telehealth-adoption-predicts-more-chronic-carehttps://www.mobihealthnews.com/news/mobihealthnews-predictions-2021-price-transparency-tools-will-be-game-changer-telemedicine-use
February 4, 2021
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NEJM This Week — February 4, 2021

Featuring articles on an mRNA-1273 vaccine to prevent Covid-19, a trial of hydroxychloroquine to prevent Covid-19, breast cancer risk revisited, much ado about certain breast cancer genes, and race and genetic ancestry in medicine; a review article on antithrombotic therapy after acute coronary syndromes; a Clinical Problem-Solving describing the hunt for a diagnosis; and Perspective articles on vaccine innovations, on the search of a better equation, and on learning about end-of-life care from Grandpa. Supplement to the New England Journal of Medicine, Vol. 384, No. 5.
February 3, 2021
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Mobile Stroke Units and Stroke Outcomes, Yield of Exome Sequencing for Cerebral Palsy, USPSTF Guideline on Screening for Carotid Artery Stenosis, and more

Editor's Summary by Howard Bauchner, MD, Editor in Chief of JAMA, the Journal of the American Medical Association, for the February 2, 2021 issue
February 2, 2021
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Stupid Endometriosis With Melissa Boudreau, Host of "the Cycle" Melissa is a genuine voice for the 1 in 10 women worldwide who have Endometriosis.