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The Redox Podcast

The Redox Podcast

Explore some of the biggest problems in healthcare, and hear from industry leaders about how technology is being deployed to solve them.

Latest From Series

Shift+6: [email protected] Health

I've known Greg Tracy since before founding Redox, connecting over civic hacking projects in Madison, Wisconsin. As the co-founder and CTO, Greg helped Propeller Health from its inception to serving patients across the globe and through its recent acquisition by ResMed (for $225M), where he now serves as the chief architect. Greg shares the Propeller Health story, their early choice to go through FDA clearance, and how they built the business into a global brand, as well as the constant struggle to prioritize projects, no matter how large the organization. He’s always been a mentor to the up and coming developer-leaders in Madison; this conversation exemplifies this. Thanks for the great conversation Greg! 1:12 Overview of Propeller Health’s product offering 3:09 Greg’s background and starting Propeller 8:29 Balancing speed and quality in an FDA certified domain 11:57 Managing a diverse set of users and stakeholders 14:29 “Suck” meetings for engineering 16:59 Getting acquired by a public company 23:24 Prioritizing endless wants 27:19 How Slack fails product teams 30:00 The best innovation in healthcare comes from those without experience Find Greg on Twitter (@GregTracy).
September 24, 2020

#27 Nikita, Nikhil, and Niko

Nikita Singareddy and Nikhil Krishnan joined me on the show this week. You don’t often hear their last names as these two have rapidly earned their way into the ranks of first-name status in our industry. I wanted to have both of them on the show together as they have incredible rapport and both bring an absolutely refreshing and unique perspective on the industry, as younger analysts having graduated college in ‘16 and ’14. Nikita (@singareddynm) is the creator of the Waiting Room blog. Her recent coverage of the new interoperability regulations is one of the best out there. In her day job, she’s an investor at RRE Ventures. She cut her teeth in healthcare working at Oscar Health. Nikhil (@nikillinit) is the creator of the Out-Of-Pocket blog. He brings a satirical slant to his coverage of more esoteric slices of our industry, employing memes throughout to shine a light on the ridiculousness of the various arrangements he uncovers. The conversation jumps around a bit and they end up making my job really easy, interviewing each other on how they met, industry trends, how they got into the space, and tips for young people trying to do the same. Here are some highlights: 2:51 - Nikhil’s background avoiding healthcare, then ending up here 5:04 - Tips for people breaking into healthcare 6:56 - What will change as Millennials and GenZ emerge 11:18 - Creating a safe environment for creative courage 13:34 - Here’s the Venture Stories podcast Nikita mentions 17:13 - Nikita’s journey from Oscar to RRE 19:28 - Current industry trends driving Nikhil’s and Nikita’s investments 28:33 - How consumers are poised to upend existing business models 35:15 - Nikita’s thoughts on her next job 37:46 - Nikhil’s vision for Out-Of-Pocket Hope you enjoyed the conversation. As always, send any feedback, suggestions, ideas to [email protected]
September 21, 2020

Shift+6: [email protected] Institute

Today’s guest is Danielle Ciofani. A data architect turned strategist, she leads the Broad Institute’s Data Sciences Platform team maximizing the impact of data science on the biomedical ecosystem. She also cares deeply about the startup community and serves as a mentor to early-stage companies at the intersection of healthcare and data. Prior to these roles, Danielle designed, built, and grew the largest integrated real-world database of clinical and claims data at Humdecia which was eventually acquired by Optum. I really enjoyed this conversation. I learned about how the Broad Institute (pronounced “brode”) enables genomic research (1:11) and how they manage that much data via a hybrid cloud strategy (11:20). I found their reasoning behind their decision to utilize GCP (13:58) fascinating. They’re at a point where building a federated multi-cloud architecture (17:18) spanning AWS and Azure is starting to make sense. We discussed infrastructure considerations for international expansion (22:23) and how personalized medicine can combat institutional biases (24:33) to create more equitable healthcare delivery. Danielle shares her take on the state of our healthcare system as it shifts under the weight of the pandemic (28:56) and why diversity in building teams (31:51) is so important. We get into what it means to build open-source software (34:08). Finally, Danielle shares resources to dive into for folks getting into the space (39:52). If you’re interested in reaching out to her, find her on linkedin or her website. Danielle, thank you so much for spending your time with us on the show!
September 16, 2020

#26 The state of Interoperability in 2020 with Redox’s Brendan Keeler

Before 2020 spiraled into pandemic, social, economic, and political unrest, I expected interoperability to be the hottest topic in healthcare. There are a number of reasons for this. Consumers became unruly, asking simple questions like “in this modern era, why can’t my specialist see my electronic health record?” Providers and health systems have attempted to adopt modern digital health tools, but have found difficulty in integrating these tools with their legacy EHR systems. In response to these industry-wide problems, and without a private-sector path forward, the federal government released sweeping, and some would say “heavy-handed”, set of interoperability regulations designed to create the appropriate rules and incentives to solve these problems. These regulations are rooted in Biden’s 21st Century Cures Bill, passed at the end of the Obama administration. But the actual rules and enforcement were introduced in Trump’s. This unprecedented bi-partisanship tells us at least one thing: the government has lost faith in EHR vendors and the health systems and providers that use them, to solve it on their own. Today’s show is the first of our second season of the Redox podcast. I thought it’d be a good time to unpack the word interoperability. This concept in healthcare has more depth, history, and complexity than syllables. So why is it such a big deal? How did we get to this place? And why did the government feel the need to step in? To help me with the unpacking, I invited my friend and colleague, Brendan Keeler to join us. Brendan is a product leader at Redox, helping to translate industry demand into Redox supply. Before Redox, Brendan worked on interoperability at Epic both domestically and internationally. I’ve found his views on the space to be particularly insightful and concise, and lean on him constantly as I grapple with emerging trends. Highlights from the conversation: 2:27 - Three types of interop: Integration, Enterprise Interoperability, Patient Auth 7:11 - Common standards used for each type of interoperability (HL7v2, C-CDA, FHIR) 11:50 - Will FHIR start to replace other interoperability standards 15:14 - The regulatory push towards ubiquitous use of FHIR 19:03 - Why banking didn’t need the same regulatory pressure 23:51 - If we want ubiquitous adoption of FHIR, we should have penalized the use of HL7v2 26:12 - How the Big Fax will forever hold back innovation in US healthcare 27:06 - Takeaways on interoperability for developers, providers, patients, and integration analysts Brendan, you’re the man. Thanks for joining the show and sharing your take on the current state of interoperability in healthcare. Find Brendan and continue the conversation on Twitter: @healthbjk. He’s a great follow. If you liked today’s show music, we’ve got to thank Redox’s very own Stephen Herrera who gave up what would have been a prosperous career as a DJ to join our operations team.
September 10, 2020

#26 The State of Interoperability in 2020 with Redox’s Brendan Keeler

Before 2020 spiraled into pandemic, social, economic, and political unrest, I expected interoperability to be the hottest topic in healthcare. There are a number of reasons for this. Consumers became unruly, asking simple questions like “in this modern era, why can’t my specialist see my electronic health record?” Providers and health systems have attempted to adopt modern digital health tools, but have found difficulty in integrating these tools with their legacy EHR systems. In response to these industry-wide problems, and without a private-sector path forward, the federal government released sweeping, and some would say “heavy-handed”, set of interoperability regulations designed to create the appropriate rules and incentives to solve these problems. These regulations are rooted in Biden’s 21st Century Cures Bill, passed at the end of the Obama administration. But the actual rules and enforcement were introduced in Trump’s. This unprecedented bi-partisanship tells us at least one thing: the government has lost faith in EHR vendors and the health systems and providers that use them, to solve it on their own. Today’s show is the first of our second season of the Redox podcast. I thought it’d be a good time to unpack the word interoperability. This concept in healthcare has more depth, history, and complexity than syllables. So why is it such a big deal? How did we get to this place? And why did the government feel the need to step in? To help me with the unpacking, I invited my friend and colleague, Brendan Keeler to join us. Brendan is a product leader at Redox, helping to translate industry demand into Redox supply. Before Redox, Brendan worked on interoperability at Epic both domestically and internationally. I’ve found his views on the space to be particularly insightful and concise, and lean on him constantly as I grapple with emerging trends. Highlights from the conversation: 2:27 - Three types of interop: Integration, Enterprise Interoperability, Patient Auth 7:11 - Common standards used for each type of interoperability (HL7v2, C-CDA, FHIR) 11:50 - Will FHIR start to replace other interoperability standards 15:14 - The regulatory push towards ubiquitous use of FHIR 19:03 - Why banking didn’t need the same regulatory pressure 23:51 - If we want ubiquitous adoption of FHIR, we should have penalized the use of HL7v2 26:12 - How the Big Fax will forever hold back innovation in US healthcare 27:06 - Takeaways on interoperability for developers, providers, patients, and integration analysts Brendan, you’re the man. Thanks for joining the show and sharing your take on the current state of interoperability in healthcare. Find Brendan and continue the conversation on Twitter: @healthbjk. He’s a great follow. If you liked today’s show music, we’ve got to thank Redox’s very own Stephen Herrera who gave up what would have been a prosperous career as a DJ to join our operations team.
September 10, 2020

Shift+6: [email protected]

We’re thrilled to announce Shift+6, a developer-focused, health-tech podcast from Redox. Here we'll explore the ways amazing technologists are bringing new innovation to market, growing their teams, and dealing with an ever-changing landscape in one of the world's most complex industries. We believe that technology from diverse and empathetic creators holds the power to improve the lives of patients across the globe. And we hope this podcast helps make your work in healthcare even more impactful. Our first guest is Ryan Scharer, the CTO of a new (and maybe in stealth mode?) telehealth startup called Folx. You might be wondering, “Does the world really need another telehealth offering?” Short answer: yes, this world does. Folx is aimed at LGBTQ+ communities with representative care providers, “Telehealth that’s pretty queer” as their website states. Check out their purpose statement here, it’s moving. Ryan’s building on a long history of success in the digital health space, having played this early-stage engineering lead role at Humedica (acquired by Optum) and PatientPing. We dive into those early decisions and tradeoffs we make in building product and eventually taking it to scale. Here are some highlights: 2:00 - Ryan pitches Folx 4:33 - unique features, based on this demographic 6:07 - contrasting more established digital health with early-stage startups 8:53 - new technologies Ryan’s excited about 13:10 - balancing moving fast, or building things for scale 17:33 - the benefits of experience in getting started 20:34 - choosing an EHR 29:45 - resources for getting started in health tech Ryan mentioned to reach out to him on LinkedIn if you have questions or want to start a conversation. Thanks for tuning into our first episode of Shift+6. We’ll be launching our own podcast show soon so look out for that and be sure to subscribe. And let me know if you have ideas or feedback for the show. We’re excited to bring this to the healthcare developer community.
September 3, 2020

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The Redox Podcast

Redox exists to improve healthcare by uniting patients and providers through easily accessible technology. Technology can dramatically improve healthcare. It helps healthcare organizations become more efficient. It gives patients more control of their healthcare experience. And when done right, technology removes distractions so providers can focus on what’s important: their patients.
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Host

Niko Skievaski

Niko Skievaski

Niko is the President & Co-Founder of Redox, a leading interoperability platform powering digital health innovation at more than 700 healthcare organizations. Prior, he worked at Epic, where he saw first hand how the need to solve interoperability is one of the biggest challenges facing healthcare today. He's the Co-founder of 100state, Wisconsin's largest co-working space, and creator of Struck by Orca, healthcare's pivotal book on ICD-10. He has degrees in Economics from Arizona State and Boston University and lives in Boulder, CO with his partner, toddler, and collection of mountain bikes.

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