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Day Zero

Day Zero

Exploring the Entrepreneurial Journey of Healthcare Founders.

All Episodes

35: I AM ALS, with Brian Wallach, J.D., Co-founder and Board Co-chair, Synapticure and Co-founder, I AM ALS, and Sandra Abrevaya, J.D., Co-founder and CEO, Synapticure, Co-founder, I AM ALS

Meet Brian Wallach, J.D. and Sandra Abrevaya, J.D.:In 2017, Brian Wallach, J.D. learned that he was diagnosed with ALS. He and his wife Sandra Abrevaya, J.D. are dedicating their remaining time together to help ALS patients everywhere. They founded I AM ALS, a non-profit organization that successfully advocated for millions in research through major legislation. Brian and Sandra also launched Synapticure, a care platform for ALS patients, with the backing of GV and other investors. They are on a mission to reshape our understanding and treatment of ALS.Key Insights:Brian and Sandra are truly inspirational, revealing how a family can go forward with a devastating diagnosis and what two people can accomplish in such a short amount of time.Founding I AM ALS. Sandra and Brian founded the non-profit I AM ALS to create policy change. Their advocacy facilitated the passage of Act for ALS, which allocates $100 million annually over five years for research and expands treatment options for patients. I AM ALS also provides a platform for patients and caregivers to get support and share their stories, and for volunteers to take “micro actions” that advocate for patients. (12:32)Founding Synapticure. Synapticure provides ALS patients a care coordinator that helps manage the administrative burden of coordinating between the patient’s entire care team. It also facilitates access to cutting-edge and personalized testing and treatment; ALS is a heterogeneous disease with many sub-types that respond differently to targeted therapies. Sandra and Brian founded this company to create the continuity of care they wished they had during their treatment experience. (21:28)Power in the Purpose. Brian gets his energy from the knowledge that he and Sandra can change the course of ALS with their advocacy. He is driven partially by necessity, but also the belief that he can make a difference, and potentially save his life and 1000’s of others. (31:00)This episode is hosted by Gary Bisbee, Ph.D. He is the Founder, Chairman, and CEO of Think MediumRelevant Links:Learn more about I AM ALS and how to take actionLearn more about SynapticureRead “I am Brian Wallach” Read “I am Sandra Abrevaya and Brian Wallach”
May 24, 2022
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34: Bringing Clinical Trials to the Patient, with Jodi Akin, Founder and Chief Executive Officer, Hawthorne Effect, Inc.

Meet Jodi Akin: Jodi Akin is the Founder, Chairman, and CEO of Hawthorne Effect, a software service that  streamlines and decentralizes clinical trials. She is an Angle Investor and Advisor for Astia, Board  member for 510 Kardiac Devices, Inc., and the Chief Scientific Advisor for PiCardia, Inc. Previously,  she was the Vice President of Global Clinical Affairs at Edwards Lifesciences LLC. Jodi received a  Bachelor’s in Diplomacy, Economics and International Affairs from Georgetown University, and a  Master of Science in Nursing from Pace University. Key Insights: The Hawthorne Effect is changing the ecosystem of clinical trials. Defining Entrepreneurship. Entrepreneurship is an attitude, not a stage of a company, according to Jodi. She didn’t set out to simply found a company, rather she felt a gravitational pull, a compulsion, to fix an aspect of healthcare. (10:39) Improved Patient Adherence. Hawthorne Effect brings clinical trials to the patient’s own home, rather than requiring the patient to go to a physical research institution. This removes transportation challenges for the patient, which increases adherence. Jodi cites that 97-98% of their patients adhere to clinical trials. (15:48) Hawthorne Heroes. Decentralized clinical trials are made possible by a gig network of medical professionals. This allows for geographically diverse trials, and these Heroes have additional opportunities for certification and training for different types of trials, with roles that range from patient visits to trial investigators. (18:03)This episode is hosted by Gary Bisbee, Ph.D. He is the Founder, Chairman, and CEO of Think  Medium. Relevant Links:Learn more about Hawthorne Effect Read “Startup Improves Clinical Trial Process To Ensure Better Healthcare For All” by  Forbes Listen to “Hawthorne Effect Founder and CEO Jodi Akin” on VatorNews podcasts
May 17, 2022
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33: Disrupting the Healthcare Economy, with Mike McSherry, Founder and CEO, Xealth; Brandon Weber, Co-founder and CEO, Nava; and Sean Mehra, Founder and CEO, HealthTap

Meet the Guests:This episode showcases three guests previously featured on Day Zero. Mike McSherry is the CEO of Xealth, a platform that facilitates clinicians prescribing digital health tools to patients, tracking usage, and improving digital health recommendations. Brandon Weber is the co-founder and CEO of Nava, a benefits brokerage firm that facilitates high quality healthcare to employers. Sean Mehra is the founder and CEO of HealthTap, a virtual-first, affordable urgent and primary care clinic. Key Insights:Healthcare presents a unique ecosystem for entrepreneurs. No market is as complicated, regulated, and confusing as healthcare.Advancing Technology.  Entrepreneurism in healthcareis extra challenging because healthcare often lags in adopting new technology. A hospital may have cutting edge MRIs, and yet still use fax machines. Unpredictable adoption can be due variable reimbursement plans, conflicting incentives, and government regulations. (1:39)Fixing the Bottleneck. There is a huge explosion of innovation on the supply side of healthcare, but it is not reaching buyers. Part of the bottleneck is in the benefits brokerage industry. Brandon thinks the future might already be here, it’s just not evenly distributed. (3:30)Expanding the Production Possibility Frontier. In the next 5-10 years, Sean predicts that technology innovation will make supply and demand transactions more efficient, such as telehealth better connecting patients to providers, and make supply itself more efficient, like AI and algorithms to help providers. (5:39)
May 10, 2022
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32: L.O.V.E. to Lead, with Sean Lane, Chief Executive Officer, Olive

Meet Sean Lane:Sean Lane is the CEO of Olive and CEO of Circulo Health. Previously, he was an Intelligence Officer for the National Security Agency. He was also founder and Chairman of the Board for Betamore, and Founder and Chairman Emeritus of Digital Harbor Foundation. Sean received a Bachelor’s in Political Science and Government from Miami University. Key Insights:Sean Lane is freeing up healthcare’s scarcest resource: time. The Inspiration for Olive. Sean was trying to address prescription drug abuse challenges in his community when he realized that healthcare doesn’t have the internet. Healthcare systems and software don’t communicate, rather healthcare relies on humans as routers to complete repetitive tasks and manually share data. (7:46)What Olive Can Do. Using artificial Intelligence, Olive automates repetitive healthcare tasks to free up human capacity. It started with revenue cycle, but expanded into areas of administration and operation. (15:05)Challenges. To Sean, Olive’s biggest challenge is scale. There are billions of hours of human capacity wasted on repetitive tasks that could be automated. In order to have an impact on the industry, Olive needs to get big enough to matter. (16:26)This episode is hosted by Gary Bisbee, Ph.D. He is the Founder, Chairman, and CEO of Think Medium. Relevant Links:Learn more about OliveCheck out Sean’s websiteWatch “A plan to redirect a trillion dollars in the US healthcare system with Olive CEO Sean Lane”
May 3, 2022
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31: How to Do Hard Things in a Human Way, with Rasmus Hougaard, Founder and CEO, Potential Project

Meet Rasmus Hougaard:Rasmus Hougaard is the Founder and Managing Partner of the Potential Project. He is the author of “The Mind of the Leader,” “One Second Ahead,” and recently published “Compassionate Leadership: How to Do Hard Things in a Human Way.” Rasmus is also a contributor for the Harvard Business Review, Forbes and Business Insider. He received a Master’s degree in Organization and Behavior Studies from Roskilde University.Key Insights:Rasmus Hougaard is on a mission to create a more human world of work.Behind the Why. While working for a large corporation, Rasmus realized that many of his coworkers were burned out, drained of creativity, and not living up to their potential. Armed with meditation and other practices he learned from Buddhist traditions, Rasmus set out to found the Potential Project and change the working world. (1:02)Rethinking the Great Resignation. An unprecedented number of employees are quitting, or considering quitting. Rasmus reframes this as an opportunity for leaders to be compassionate to their existing employees, and a chance to attract new talent. (19:32) Get Enough Sleep. Get enough sleep and make time for yourself. Self-compassion is fundamental to resiliency. Before you can take care of others, and the world, you need to take care of yourself. (25:30)This episode is hosted by Gary Bisbee, Ph.D. He is the Founder, Chairman, and CEO of Think Medium.Relevant Links:Learn more about the Potential ProjectCheck out Rasmus’ book “Compassionate Leadership: How to Do Hard Things in a Human Way”Read Rasmus’ contributions to Forbes on Leadership Strategy
April 26, 2022
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30: Bridging Gaps in Women's Healthcare, with Leah Sparks, CEO and Founder, Wildflower Health

Meet Leah Sparks:Leah Sparks is the CEO and Founder of Wildflower Health. She is also a co-chair and Board Member of HT4M. Previously, Leah was the Vice President of Strategy and Business Development for DNA Direct and the Vice President of Oncology Solutions at McKesson. Leah received a B.S. in Journalism from the University of Tennessee and an MBA from the University of Virginia. Key Insights:Wildflower bridges gaps in women’s healthcare with digital solutions.Complimenting Partnerships. Leah had industry knowledge and a vision to make women’s care better. So, she found a co-founder that complimented her skill set, who knew how to build a product and manage engineers. Additionally, Leah knows she is a big-picture thinker, and so surrounds herself with detail-oriented team members. (4:54)The Value of Feedback. Leah recommends that entrepreneurs listen to market feedback and seek industry experts. Having a variety of advisers from different perspectives will put your company on the right path. (6:40)Wildflower Expansion. Wildflower’s immediate priority is to scale up existing contracts and better support customers. On the horizon, Leah envisions an advanced primary care model that leverages the close relationship women have with obstetricians. (15:51)This episode is hosted by Aaron Martin. He is a member of the Advisory Council for Day Zero and is the Vice President of Healthcare at Amazon.Relevant Links:Learn more about WildflowerWatch Leah’s TEDMED talkRead “Smarter Health Care on Your Smartphone: An Interview With Leah Sparks, Co-Founder and CEO of Wildflower Health”
April 19, 2022
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29: Data Powered, People Centered, with Rajeev Singh, CEO and Chairperson, Accolade

Meet Rajeev Singh:Rajeev Singh is the Accolade CEO and Chairperson. Accolade is transforming employer health benefits programs through providing personalized, continuous and integrated health services. Rajeev is also a board member of Avalara and Amperity, and a Trustee of the Seattle Children’s Hospital Foundation. Previously, Rajeev was the Co-founder, President and COO of Concur Technologies, which was sold to SAP for $8.3 billion. He graduated with a B.S.E. from Western Michigan University.Key Insights:Rajeev Singh is a successful entrepreneur who pivoted to healthcare to make tangible, positive change in people’s lives.Identity. Like many entrepreneurs, Rajeev saw his company as part of his identity. After he sold Concur Technology, Rajeev went through a period of depression. He took nine months to reinspect his identity and rediscover himself before he was ready for the next challenge. (9:18)Leadership. Rajeev shares that sometimes leaders try to replicate a leadership style they read about in a book. He encourages leaders to be themselves, and embrace their unique strengths. Don’t copy someone else, be you. (10:51)Introspection. Entrepreneurship is rewarding, but inspect and understand your motives first. Do you love creating things from scratch and can’t image your life any other way? Then follow your entrepreneurial dreams! If you just want to make money, maybe do something else. (32:52)This episode is hosted by Gary Bisbee, Ph.D. He is the Founder, Chairman, and CEO of Think Medium.  Relevant Links:Learn more about AccoladeFollow Rajeev on TwitterRead “Q&A with Rajeev Singh, CEO of Accolade”
April 12, 2022
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28: with Leshika Samarasinghe, Founder and General Partner, Twine Ventures

Meet Leshika Samarasinghe:Leshika Samarasinghe is the Founder and General Partner at Twine Ventures. She is an investor in a number of companies including Waymark, Stealth Fintech, Apella Technology, Teiko.bio, Rupa Health, and Alaffia Health. Previously, she was a Venture Partner at Future Positive and Managing Partner at The Production Board. Leshika received a B.A. in international Relations at Stanford University and an MBA from Harvard Business School.Key Insights:Leshika Samarasinghe works with mission-driven, early-stage founders.Founder Relationships. Leshika chooses founders that have a strong founder-market fit and who are excellent at communicating their company’s story. She also emphasizes the importance of the investor-founder relationship, which should be based on trust and shared vision. (6:48)Intentional Fundraising. Twine Ventures raises money from investment funds that are dedicated to investing in venture funds. These types of funds are nimble and have experience helping new companies ramp up. Additionally, Twine Ventures is intentional about seeking individual limited partners (LPs) that provide complimentary abilities or expertise. (9:21)Time is Scarce for Founders. It’s important to create time and space to learn, think, and voraciously read. Leshika anchors that time to her investments, diving deep into the industry or product. This way she is prepared for conversations with founders. (14:56)This episode is hosted by Julie Yoo. She is a member of the Advisory Council for Day Zero and is a General Partner at Andreessen Horowitz.Relevant Links:Learn more about Twine VenturesLearn more about Leshika Samarasinghe
April 5, 2022
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27: HIMSS-22: Top Health IT Trends, with Kaveh Safavi, M.D., J.D., John Glaser, Ph.D, and Suchi Saria, Ph.D.

Meet the Panel Guests:This panel features three guests previously featured at Think Medium. John Glaser, Ph.D. is an Executive-in- Residence at the Harvard Medical School Executive Education. Suchi Saria, Ph.D. is the founder and CEO of Bayesian Health. She is also an Advisory Council member for Day Zero. Kaveh Safavi, M.D., J.D. is the Senior Managing Director at Accenture. Key Insights:Three health technology and data experts discuss healthcare trends and innovations that emerged during the HIMSS conference.Uneven Distribution of AI. Dr. Glaser points out that AI technology has made huge advancements; however, it is unevenly distributed throughout healthcare. AI itself isn’t purchased, rather there is a product that performs better because of AI. Advancements in AI need to effectively solve specific problems for adoption to occur. (17:33)Challenges to AI Usage. Dr. Safavi points out thata challenge to AI usage is the privacy and consent necessary to utilize patient data. This is a policy and regulation issue that requires government intervention. Additionally, for AI to be reliable, bias in data needs to be mitigated, focusing on quality over quantity. (22:35)We Have the Tools! Dr. Saria adds that there are many tools and techniques available to monitor and measure bias.However, those tools are variably implemented across the industry and understanding of best practices is inconsistent. (23:46)This episode is hosted by Gary Bisbee, Ph.D. He is the Founder, Chairman, and CEO of Think Medium.Relevant Links:Learn more about HIMSSCheck out The Gary Bisbee Show interview with John Glaser, Ph.D.Check out Day Zero’s interview with Suchi Saria, Ph.D.Check out The Gary Bisbee Show interview with Kaveh Safavi, M.D., J.D.
March 29, 2022
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26: Making Sci-Fi a Reality, with Nina Tandon, Ph.D., Co-founder and CEO, EpiBone

Meet Nina Tandon, Ph.D.:Nina Tandon, Ph.D. is the CEO and co-founder of EpiBone. She is a TED Senior Fellow, Adjunct Professor of Electrical Engineering at the Cooper Union, and a former Staff Associate Postdoctoral Researcher in the Laboratory for Stem Cells and Tissue Engineering at Columbia University. Dr. Tandon is also the co-author of “Super Cells: Building with Biology.” She received a Master’s in Electrical Engineering from MIT, and a Ph.D. in Biomedical Engineering and an MBA from Columbia University.Key Insights:Nina Tandon, Ph.D. realized that the technologies running our bodies are a lot like the wires and hard drives that we build with our hands. Nina works in the technology between cells and circuits.Alternative Funding. EpiBone was incubated in Academia. Initial funding for research came from a translation grant. Grants are a good option for academic entrepreneurs like Dr. Tandon, because writing grant proposals is familiar, the rigorous peer review serves as due diligence, and the grant funding de-risks the investment. (8:03)EpiBone Explained. EpiBone technology utilizes a patient’s own stem cells to grow bone or cartilage into the shape and structure that patient needs. EpiBone has started with facial bones, but sees a future with orthopedic applications. (11:52)Entrepreneurship is like the Olympics. All Olympians should have coaches, and CEOs are no different. What is demanded of Dr. Tandon is constantly changing. Coaching helps her understand her weaknesses, manage stress, and realize problems before they magnify. (23:47)This episode is hosted by Aaron Martin. He is a member of the Advisory Council for Day Zero and is Executive Vice President and Chief Digital Officer at Providence, and Managing General Partner of Providence Ventures. Relevant Links:Learn more about EpiBoneRead “Why Every Life Science CEO Needs a Leadership Coach” by Nina TandonWatch “Personalized Surgery: Growing Your Own Bone” by Slice of MIT
March 22, 2022
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25: Aging with Strength, with Amanda Rees, Co-founder and CEO, Bold

Meet Amanda Rees:Amanda Rees is the co-founder and CEO of Bold, a digital platform that creates personalized science-based programs to help people age better. Previously, she was a Program Manager of Renewable Energy and Climate at the 11th Hour Project. Amanda received a BSE in Chemical and Biological Engineering from Princeton University.Key Insights:Amanda Rees wants to keep people healthy, active, and out of hospitals. Bold as a digitally scalable way to prevent falls and associated hospitalization for older adults. Healthy Digital Aging. Amanda and her co-founder faced ageist attitudes from potential partners and investors; they didn’t share the vision that the future of healthy aging would be digital. This perspective drastically shifted during the pandemic as people of all ages became more digitally connected. (5:58)Choosing the Business Model. Bold started with direct-to-consumer marketing so they could grow faster and support more members sooner. They eventually moved into business-to-business partnerships to make their platform more accessible. While it can feel like these business models are at odds, Amanda sees them as part of a holistic business system. (8:34)Do User Testing. Regardless of the product, Amanda recommends founders get feedback from potential customers. For Bold, Amanda knew that users don’t like being defined by their age. Bold acknowledges the aging process, but doesn’t focus on the specific age of its users. (18:11)This episode is hosted by Julie Yoo. He is a member of the Advisory Council for Day Zero and is a General Partner at Andreessen Horowitz.Relevant Links:Learn more about BoldFollow Amanda on TwitterRead “Health tech startup Bold raises $7 million in seed funding for senior-focused fitness programs”
March 15, 2022
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24: Ethical Autonomous AI Diagnosis, with Michael D. Abramoff, M.D., Ph.D., Founder and Executive Chairman, Digital Diagnostics

Meet Michael D. Abramoff, M.D., Ph.D.:Michael D. Abramoff, M.D., Ph.D. is neuroscientist, fellowship-trained retina specialist, and computer engineer. He is the Founder and Executive Chairman at Digital Diagnostics as well as the Robert C. Watzke, M.D., Professor of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences at the University of Iowa. Previously, he was the Founder, CEO, and Executive Chairman of IDx. Dr. Abramoff received his M.D. from the University of Amsterdam and Ph.D. in Medical Imaging from Utrecht University. Key Insights:Dr. Abramoff’s company Digital Diagnostics developed the first FDA approved autonomous AI. Closing the Care Gap. The primary care physicians and endocrinologists most involved in diabetes care lack the expertise to diagnose diabetic retinopathy. Digital Diagnostics’ autonomous AI can make that diagnosis in-office, rather than referring the patient out to another specialist. (8:29)Earning Reimbursement. To get buy in from clinicians and the FDA, Digital Diagnostics had to show that their product was safe, effective, and built on diverse data to prevent bias. Additionally, early on they claimed that as creators of the AI, they are liable for its performance. These features eventually led to a CPT code, creating proof of concept and a path for autonomous AI in healthcare. (12:58)Ethics in AI. When hiring engineers and developers, Dr. Abramoff emphasized the importance of ethics. Single characters in their code could make a difference for a patient. Their work at the aggregate needed to represent individual patients and account for their individual experiences. (22:16)This episode is hosted by Suchi Saria, Ph.D. She is a member of the Advisory Council for Day Zero and is the founder and CEO of Bayesian Health. She is also an Associate Professor of computer science, statistics, and health policy, and the Director of the Machine Learning and Healthcare Lab at Johns Hopkins UniversityRelevant Links:Learn more about Digital DiagnosticsLearn more about Dr. AbramoffListen to “Building the First FDA Approved Autonomous AI in Healthcare,” Digital Diagnostics’ podcast featuring Dr. Abramoff
March 8, 2022
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23: The Unique Challenges of Healthcare Founders, with Mike McSherry, Founder and CEO, Xealth

Meet Mike McSherry:Mike McSherry is the CEO of Xealth, a platform that facilitates clinicians prescribing digital health tools to patients, tracking usage, and improving digital health recommendations. Previously, Mike was an entrepreneur in Residence at Providence. He has cofounded six startups including Boost Mobile, Swipe, and Zivo Internet Services. He received a B.A. in Economics and International Business from William and Mary.Key Insights:Mike McSherry has been an entrepreneur for 25 years. His experience is primarily with mobile and technology, but he moved into healthcare for his most recent project, Xealth. Know Your Audience. Founders in healthcare need to consider who is the customer. Is it health insurance, health systems, employers, pharmaceutical companies, consumers? While healthcare accounts for 18% of the U.S. GDP, when broken down by payer, healthcare is not a $1   trillion-dollar industry, rather it’s one thousand billion-dollar industries. (5:00)Advancing Healthcare Technology.  Healthcare innovation is extra challenging because healthcare often lags in adopting new technology. A hospital may have cutting edge MRIs, and yet also use fax machines. This is due to a combination of bureaucracy, reimbursement structures, and a reticence by staff to adopt new technology. (16:25)What’s Next for Xealth? Xealth will continue to expand the number of health systems they work with, and increase the number of digital tools available for prescription. Xealth is looking to be the bridge between healthcare and social determinants of health. (23:42)This episode is hosted by Aaron Martin. He is a member of the Day Zero Advisory Council and he is EVP and Chief Digital Officer of Providence and Managing General Partner of Providence Ventures.Relevant Links:Learn more about XealthRead “Xealth CEO Mike McSherry on Becoming ‘the Surescripts for Digital Health” 
March 1, 2022
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22: Insights from a Serial Entrepreneur, with Derek Streat, Founder, CEO, and Chairman, DexCare

Meet Derek Streat:Derek Streat is the CEO of DexCare. He is also the current co-founder and Chairman of the Board at Improving Renal Outcomes Collaborative. Previously, he was the co-founder, CEO, and chairman of the Board at C-SATS, Medify, and AdReady. He was also involved in the early founding of Classmates. He received a Bachelor’s degree in Finance and Information Management Systems from the University of Iowa.Key Insights:Derek Streat is a technology entrepreneur on his sixth venture-backed start up. Advise for Entrepreneurs. To be a successful healthcare entrepreneur, you need to check yourself at the door and leverage the help of experts. The statistical chance of you being 100% right is low, you need the help of others. (5:37)Innovation Challenges Unique to Healthcare. Health systems requires founders to walk a fine line. You can’t promise too much and fail on delivery, but if you lack a far-reaching vision that aligns with the health system, you won’t land the partnership in the first place. (18:49)Let Vision Drive You. Never lose sight of the opportunity to do something that really matters. There will always be roadblocks, healthcare is uniquely challenging for entrepreneurs, but once you get over the hump you will have done what most other people don’t have the fortitude to do. (23:50)This episode is hosted by Aaron Martin. He is a member of the Advisory Council for Day Zero and is the Executive Vice President and Chief Digital Officer for Providence, and Managing General Partner of PV.Relevant Links:Learn more about DexCareLearn more about Improving Renal Outcomes CollaborativeListen to “Derek Streat, CEO of DexCare & Entrepreneur in Residence at Providence Health”
February 22, 2022
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21: Collaborative Care for Mental Health, with Virna Little, Psy.D., Co-founder and COO, and Shane Hutchins, Co-founder and CEO, Concert Health

Meet Virna Little, Psy.D.:Virna Little, Psy.D. is a clinical psychologist and the co-founder and Chief Operating Officer of Concert Health. She is also a Zero Suicide Faculty at the Education Development Center and an Advisory Board Member for the Network for Excellence in Health Innovation. She received her PsyD in Psychology from California Coast University and Master of Social Work from Fordham University.Meet Spencer Hutchins:Spencer Hutchins is the founder and CEO of Concert Health. Previously, Spencer was co-founded and CEO of Reflexion Health and Senior Director of Business Development and Strategy at West Wireless Health Institute. He also served as a member of the founding healthcare team at the Federal Communications Commission and as a consultant at Booz & Company. Spencer received an MBA from Yale School of Management.Key Insights:Virna Little, Psy.D., an experienced clinician, and Spencer Hutchins, an experienced entrepreneur, are working to seamlessly integrate physical, behavioral, and mental healthcare. Collaborative Care. Collaborative care is patient-centered care. Patients are given the flexibility to choose their treatment path. It leverages the trust and relationship patients build with their primary care physician and compliments it with a team of specialists. (8:36)How to Disrupt Healthcare. Spencer points out that sometimes disruptors pretend that the complexity of healthcare doesn’t exist. Effective disruption must take into account the complicated relationship between providers, patients, and payers. He emphasizes the importance of humility, and being honest when you don’t have all the answers. (12:26)Attracting Talent. It’s important to think about how clinicians fit into your product. Concert Health provides fair pay and benefits, as well as a broader value proposition: at Concert Health, providers can become better clinically, and do the most good for the largest number of people. (17:50)Advice for Entrepreneurs. Dr. Little advises that entrepreneurs be thoughtful about finding the right partner. Her and Spencer’s strong partnership is foundational to Concert Health. (28:28)This episode is hosted by Rich Roth. He is a member of the Advisory Council for Day Zero and is the Senior Vice President and Chief Strategic Innovation Officer with Common Spirit Health.Relevant Links:Learn more about Concert HealthListen to “The Future of Collaborative Mental Health with Spencer Hutchins of Concert Health”Listen to an “Interview with Dr. Virna Little” about healthcare workers’ mental health
February 15, 2022
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20: Rearchitecting Rural Health, with Jennifer Schneider, M.D., M.S., Co-founder and CEO, Welina Care; Executive-in-Residence, General Catalyst

Meet Jennifer Schneider, M.D., M.S.:Jennifer Schneider, M.D., M.S. is the co-founder and CEO of Welina Care. Dr. Schneider is on the board of Directors for Health Assurance Acquisition Corp. She is also the author of “Decoding Health Signals: Silicon Valley’s Consumer-First Approach to a New Era of Health.” Previously, Dr. Schneider served as Chief Medical Officer and President for Livongo, and the Chief Medical Officer for Castlight. She received a Doctor of Medicine from Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, and a Master’s in Health Services Research from Stanford University. Key Insights:Dr. Schneider’s background in data science and specialty care has led to her newest project, rearchitecting care delivery in rural America. Personalization Through Language. Using data to better personalize health recommendations improves patient outcomes. For example, Dr. Schneider found that using the phrase “a touch of sugar” instead of “diabetes” increased enrollment in a diabetes intervention in southern populations. (6:28)Improving Rural Healthcare. 20% of people live in rural America, but rural healthcare lacks access and resources. Welina Care is working to deliver high quality specialty care to rural populations through remote monitoring, medical home delivery, and telehealth. (15:36)Becoming an Entrepreneur. Find something that matters both to you and to the healthcare ecosystem. Then, build a team of like-minded people around that goal. And know that the innovator’s journey to success is never linear. (28:50)This episode is hosted by Aaron Martin. He is a member of the Advisory Council for Day Zero and is the Executive Vice President and Chief Digital Officer for Providence, and Managing General Partner of PV.Relevant Links:Check out Dr. Schneider’s book “Decoding Health Signals: Silicon Valley’s Consumer-First Approach to a New Era of Health”Read “Click-and mortar is a better model for healthcare” by Dr. Schneider
February 8, 2022
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19: How to Truly Disrupt Healthcare with Sean Mehra, Founder and CEO, HealthTap

Meet Sean Mehra:Sean Mehra is the founder and CEO of HealthTap, a virtual-first, affordable urgent and primary care clinic. He is also a board member for Infocon Systems. Previously, Sean was the founder and CEO of PayoutHub and GXStudios. He was also the founder and a member of the operating board for the Yale Entrepreneurial Institute. Sean received a Bachelor’s in Biomedical Engineering from Yale University, and an MBA from Stanford University Graduate School of Business. Key Insights:Sean Mehra succinctly describes the state of the healthcare economy, and explores how entrepreneurs should best approach innovation.Defining the Market. Sean boils down healthcare to two parties: providers and consumers. To make true disruptive change in healthcare, solutions much directly speak to those two parties. Too much healthcare innovation caters to middlemen or ancillary institutions. (1:54)Expanding the Production Possibility Frontier. In the next 5-10 years, Sean predicts that technology will make supply and demand transactions more efficient, such as telehealth better connecting patients to providers, and make supply itself more efficient, like AI and algorithms to help providers. (8:38)The Art of Problem Solving. Great companies often don’t follow a straight line to success, rather it’s a circuitous path. It is important for entrepreneurs to be fluid and adaptable, as the market, team, and business model can evolve. Things rarely work out perfectly the first time. (16:30)This episode is hosted by Marcus Osborne. He is a member of the Advisory Council for Day Zero and the former Senior Vice President for Walmart.Relevant Links:Learn more about HealthTapFollow Sean on Twitter“HealthTap Announces Sean Mehra as Chief Executive Officer”
February 1, 2022
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18: Building Intelligent Healthcare with Chakri Toleti, Founder and CEO, care.ai

Meet Chakri Toleti:Chakri Toleti is the founder and CEO of care.ai, an artificial intelligence platform that helps organizations create smart care facilities with autonomous monitoring. Prior to founding care.ai, Chakri was the founder and CEO of HealthGrid, which was acquired by Allscripts in 2018. He was a co-founder of Galvanon, which was acquired by NCR in 2005. He also founded organizations Mahathi Software Pvt Ltd. and Cytura.Key Insights:Chakri Toleti is an experienced entrepreneur, and has a vision that healthcare can better use AI and automation for better patient outcomes.What is care.ai? Care.ai couples artificial intelligence with ambient intelligent monitoring, which collects data and develops real-time insights about clinical and operational workflows. (3:35)Scaling Up During the Pandemic.Due to the pandemic, the care.ai team could not visit client sites. They had to create hardware that was easy to install and set up. Their easy to use “plug and play” infrastructure allowed them to scale up. (10:21)Finding the Right Investors. During the fundraising process, Chakri emphasizes finding a partner that truly believes in what you are doing, and shares your long-term strategic view. (15:56)This episode is hosted by Rich Roth. He is a member of the Advisory Council for Day Zero and is the SVP and Chief Strategic Innovation Officer at CommonSpirit Health. Relevant Links:Learn more about care.aiFollow Chakri on TwitterListen to “Chakri Toleti Safeguards Patients and Improve Outcomes By Providing AI-Powered Autonomous Monitoring Platform”
January 25, 2022
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17: Meet the Host: Rich Roth, SVP and Chief Strategic Innovation Officer, CommonSpirit Health

In this episode, we get to know Day Zero Advisory Council Member Rich Roth. Rich serves as SVP and Chief Strategic Innovation Officer, CommonSpirit Health. Rich is interviewed by Gary Bisbee, Ph.D., Founder, Chairman, and CEO, Think Medium. Gary and Rich discuss the role of the Chief Strategic Innovation Officer, CommonSpirit’s priorities, and Rich’s role on the advisory council.
January 21, 2022
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16: A Modern Way to Age, with Melissa Eamer, CEO, Modern Age

Meet Melissa Eamer:Melissa Eamer is the founder and Chief Executive Officer of Modern Age, an organization that helps people take control over how they age. Previously, she was the Chief Operating Officer of Glossier, Inc. She was also the VP of Sales & Marketing for Amazon Devices, and worked at Amazon in a number of roles for 20 years. She received an MBA in Marketing from the University of Michigan and a BA in English from the University of Vermont. Key Insights:Melissa Eamer felt like there was a better way of caring for people as they age. She brings her experience as a builder and manager of software, to healthcare.The Modern Age Mission. Their goal is to help people understand their “subjective age,” the age you feel rather than the age you are. Some research suggests that if people feel younger, they take better care of themselves, and live longer. (7:02)Balancing Patience and Speed. One of the challenges Melissa faces is balancing between being patient, for the right team member or right idea, while working fast enough so that the start-up doesn’t run out of money. (12:24)Finding the Right Board Members. Melissa searched for board members that offset gaps in her experience, and would be willing to push back or have serious debates to build a better product. (16:55) This episode is hosted by Aaron Martin. He is a member of the Advisory Council for Day Zero and is the Executive Vice President and Chief Digital Officer for Providence as well as Managing General Partner of PV.Relevant Links:Learn more about Modern Age“Taking Control of the Aging Journey: Why I started Modern Age” by Melissa Eamer“Modern Age is on a mission to put people in the driver’s seat of their aging journey” by TechCrunch
January 18, 2022
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15: Meet the Hosts: Aaron Martin, EVP, Chief Digital Officer, Providence; Managing General Partner, Providence Ventures

In this episode, we get to know Day Zero advisory council member Aaron Martin. Aaron serves as EVP, Chief Digital Officer, Providence; Managing General Partner, Providence Ventures. He is interviewed by fellow Day Zero advisory council member Nathan Bays.
January 14, 2022
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14: Partnering Patients, Providers, and Technology with Tom Stanis, Founder, Story Health

Meet Tom Stanis:Tom Stanis is the founder and CEO of Story Health, a platform that uses virtual care and AI to improve treatment for high-acuity patients. Tom was also the co-founder and Head of Software at Verily Life Sciences. Prior to his entrepreneurial endeavors, he was a Principal Engineer at Google Life Sciences. Tom received a BS in Computer Science from the University of Wisconsin Madison. Key Insights:Tom Stanis entered the healthcare sector with an understanding of data, and an eye for the logistic and technology problems healthcare needs solving.Behind the Why. While at Google, Tom was hit by car. A CT scan revealed he had no broken bones, but did have stage 1 kidney cancer. That experience inspired Tom to change careers, and work to improve healthcare. (2:04)Partnership vs. From Scratch. Partnering a start-up with a big company provides capital, brand recognition, and access to technology and resources. Alternatively, founding a company from scratch allows for flexibility, nimbleness, and less bureaucracy. (12:29)Building the Right Team. The most important part of starting a business is finding the right team. Small start-up teams spend a lot of time together, there needs to be the right personality fit. Tom went through multiple groups of people before he found the right match. (18:13)This episode is hosted by Lynne Chou O’Keefe. She is a member of the Advisory Council for Day Zero and is the founder and Managing Partner of Define Ventures.Relevant Links:Learn more about Story Health“Introducing Story Health” by Tom Stanis“Verily Co-founder Launches Virtual Specialty Care Startup” by MedCity News
January 11, 2022
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13: Meet the Hosts: Lynne Chou O'Keefe, Founder and Managing Partner, Define Ventures

In this episode, hosted by Think Medium founder Gary Bisbee, Ph.D., we get to know Day Zero Advisory Council Member Lynne Chou O’Keefe. Lynne is the founder and managing partner of Define Ventures, which focuses on investing in early stage digital health companies that will redefine healthcare.
January 7, 2022
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12: Creating Healthcare IT with Cliff Illig, Co-founder, Cerner Corporation

Meet Cliff Illig:Cliff Illig is one of the co-founders of Cerner Corporation. He has served as Cerner’s Chief Operating Officer, President, and Vice Chairman. He is also a principal owner of Sporting Kansas City and founder of FanThreeSixty. Cliff was named to the Entrepreneur Hall of Fame as well as awarded the Henry W. Bloch International Entrepreneur of the Year. He is a graduate of the University of Kansas with a degree in accounting and business administration.Key Insights:Cliff Illig is a key player in the healthcare industry and has been driving impact and change for multiple decades. Becoming a Founder. Cliff and his partners realized they wanted to found a software company. They made two lists, one with industries they had knowledge of, and the other industries they knew nothing about. Healthcare was on the second list, but their knowledge of manufacturing helped create their first product for sharing lab data within a hospital. (8:05)Handling Complexity. To handle complexity, Cliff recommends breaking the problem down into smaller, compartmentalized pieces and working on those individually.Then step back and see how those individually improved pieces look combined. (12:26)If You Oppose, You Got to Propose. Early on at Cerner, Cliff and his team decided that if you spoke against something, you had to also present a better idea. This empowered employees: ideas were not stuck down because they were “bad,” rather they were replaced with better ones. (28:50)This episode is hosted by Don Trigg who is a member of the Advisory Council for Day Zero and is the former President of Cerner Corporation.Relevant Links:“Kansas Business Hall of Fame announces inductees”“Cerner co-founder Cliff Illig shares his startup story with KU MBA students” by The Lawrence Journal World“Oracle-Cerner Deal Could Help Healthcare Systems Share Data” from The Wall Street Journal
January 4, 2022
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11: Meet the Hosts: Donald Trigg, Former President, Cerner Corporation

In this episode, we get to know Day Zero advisory council member Donald Trigg. Don is interviewed by fellow advisory council member, Suchi Saria, Ph.D. Don most recently served as President of Cerner Corporation.
December 28, 2021
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10: Lifelong Lessons for Learners with Gary Bisbee, Ph.D., Founder, Chairman, and CEO, Think Medium

Meet Gary Bisbee:Gary Bisbee is founder, Chairman, and CEO of Think Medium. Prior to Think Medium, Gary was co-founder, Chairman, and CEO of The Health Management Academy. He was Chairman and CEO of APACHE Medical Systems, Aros Corporation, ReGen Biologics, and Sequel Corporation. Gary received his MBA from the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania and a Ph.D. in chronic disease epidemiology from Yale University. He is currently a member of the board of directors of Cerner Corporation. Key Insights:Gary Bisbee, Ph.D. has rich experience as a lifelong entrepreneur and accomplished board member. He shares insights valuable to founders, operators, and board members alike.Listening. When founding a company, listen to potential customers and experts knowledgeable about the field. This information adds depth to the business’ design and informs the financial model. (15:27)Advise for Board Members. Each board require Gary to play a different role. Understanding your role improves board chemistry and effectiveness. Additionally, board members must strike the balance between management and governance, and learn to ask the right questions. (23:12)Everyone as a Leader. Leaders, regardless of company size, should encourage every person to be a leader in whatever role they are in. If you treat them and define their role that way, it will pay dividends to the organization. (31:18)This episode is hosted by Nathan Bays. He is a member of the Advisory Council for Day Zero and is a senior banker at Citigroup.Relevant Links:Read more about Think MediumGary is the host of The Gary Bisbee Show, check it out hereConnect with Gary Bisbee, Ph.D. on LinkedIn
December 21, 2021
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9: Meet the Hosts: Nathan Bays, Healthcare M&A, Citi

In this episode, we get to know Day Zero advisory council member Nathan Bays. Nathan is a senior banker at Citigroup, focused on M&A and strategic advisory with Leading Health Systems and health services companies.
December 17, 2021
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8: The Language of Digital Biology with Daphne Koller, Founder and CEO, insitro

Meet Daphne Koller, Ph.D.:Daphne Koller, Ph.D. is the founder and CEO of insitro, a company that aims to improve drug discovery and development through machine learning. She is also a co-founder and board member for Engageli. Previously, Dr. Koller co-founded Coursera and served as the co-CEO, President, and eventually co-Chairman. She was also the Chief Computing Officer for CalicoLabs. Dr. Koller earned her Ph.D. in Computer Science at Stanford University and taught there as a professor for 18 years. Key Insights:Dr. Koller is “bilingual” in the worlds of biomedicine and machine learning. She has had a diverse career in academia, industry, and entrepreneurism.Two Worlds. At insitro, Dr. Koller brings together the two worlds of machine learning and biomedicine. Machine learning understands the capabilities of what data can provide, and biomedicine understands the insights that can be extracted. Working together can not only solve problems, but reveal new questions. (7:27)Science as a Team Sport. Dr. Koller contrasts academia’s focus on the individual researcher with industry’s focus on organizational growth and teamwork. She emphasizes the importance of releasing one’s ego and creating a whole that is larger than the sum of the parts. (22:16)The Right Team. It is important for founders to build the right team around them. The executive leadership needs to have the ability to strategize and shape the vision, as well as be equipped with industry expertise. From day one, be deliberate about culture and creating alignment. (25:03)This episode is hosted by Suchi Saria, Ph.D. She is a member of the Advisory Council for Day Zero and is the founder and CEO of Bayesian Health. She is also an Associate Professor of computer science, statistics, and health policy, and the Director of the Machine Learning and Healthcare Lab at Johns Hopkins University.Relevant Links:Learn more about insitroTake one of Dr. Koller’s courses on CourseraFollow Dr. Koller on Twitter
December 14, 2021
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7: Meet the Hosts: Suchi Saria, Ph.D., Founder and CEO, Bayesian Health

In this episode, we get to know Day Zero advisory council member Suchi Saria, Ph.D., Founder and CEO of Bayesian Health. Dr. Saria’s research has pioneered the development of next-generation diagnostic and treatment planning tools that use statistical machine learning methods to individualize care.
December 10, 2021
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6: Brokers for Better Benefits with Brandon Wells, Co-founder and CEO, Nava

Meet Brandon Weber:Brandon Weber is the co-founder and CEO of Nava, a benefits brokerage firm that facilitates high quality healthcare to employers. He is a co-founder and advisor for VTS and serves on the board of Directors for WiredScore. Additionally, Brandon is an Advisor for CityBldr and he previously founded and was CEO of Hightower Inc. Brandon earned degrees in Computer Information Systems and Human Computer Interactions from Carnegie Mellon University. Key Insights:When founders become truly obsessed about a problem, the solution is therapeutic. That’s how Brandon Weber feels about the ever-increasing cost of healthcare, and Nava scratches that itch.Bottleneck. There is a huge explosion of innovation on the supply side of healthcare, but it is not reaching buyers. Part of the bottleneck is in the benefits brokerage industry, which Nava hopes to change. Brandon thinks the future might already be here, it’s just not evenly distributed.(1:11)Strong Beliefs, Held Loosely. Entrepreneurs need to have an unwavering conviction that a problem exists, but listen to the data and consumers to develop solutions. (13:23)Be the Change. Brandon is passionate about convincing founders to take the leap. From family stories to subreddit anecdotes, many Americans have experienced healthcare events that adversely impacted their health or finances. There is no shortage of problems to solve. (16:29)This episode is hosted by Marcus Osborne. He is a member of the Advisory Council for Day Zero and the former Senior Vice President for Walmart Health.Relevant Links:Learn more about NavaFollow Brandon on TwitterListen to the podcast “Disrupting the healthcare benefits industry with Nava's Brandon Weber” by Authentically Successful
December 7, 2021
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5: The Human Variable with Ryan Wells, Founder and CEO, Health Here

Meet Ryan Wells:Ryan Wells is the founder and CEO of Health Here, a consumer patient platform that smooths the healthcare process. Ryan also founded InVivoLink and served as its Chairman and CEO. Prior, Ryan spent 12 years with Johnson & Johnson DePuy Orthopedics, working in sales and management. He received a Bachelor’s in Anthropology at the University of Tennessee and sits on the board of Directors for Siloam Family Health Center, Ethiopia ACT, and Oak Hill School.Key Insights:Artificial intelligence and big data can inform healthcare; however, healthcare should never lose its human touch. Ryan explores his journey through healthcare technology and founding his own digital solutions.The Human Variable. Due to constraints in data quality, Ryan believes that AI should be applied to only non-clinical parts of healthcare at this time. Additionally, AI will likely never displace the relationship between provider and patient, rather augment other aspects of the healthcare journey. (7:36)Problem-Solution Cycle. Observation and pattern recognition allows you to get to the root of a problem, and creating solutions requires timing and decisiveness. If you make a bad decision, don’t worry. Ryan emphasizes that bad decisions can often be unwound. Besides, solutions often create more problems to solve. It’s part of the process of invention. (12:43)Humility. Humility is fundamental to the early journey of entrepreneurs. It might be necessary to shift from the original vision, and success requires understanding the consumer and market, especially for more disruptive businesses. (17:50)This episode is hosted by Marcus Osborne. He is a member of the Advisory Council for Day Zero and is the Senior Vice President for Walmart Health.Relevant Links:Read more about Health Here“The Health Here Story” by Ryan Wells“Innovator CEO Profile: Health Here’s Ryan Wells” by Health Evolution
November 30, 2021
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4: Putting Humanity in Healthcare with Alexandra Drane, Co-founder and CEO, ARCHANGELS

Meet Alexandra Drane:Alexandra Drane is an entrepreneur extraordinaire. Currently, she is the co-founder and CEO of ARCHANGELS. Previously, she co-founded Eliza Corporation, Engage with Grace, Seduce Health, and Rebel Health. She served as a Wellness Expert for Prudential Financial and is also a cashier-on-leave for Walmart. She is a board member or advisor for many organizations including RAND Health, Open Notes, and Harvard Medical School’s Executive Council of the Division of Sleep Medicine.Key Insights:For Alexandra, community is the front line of health. She believes that healthcare should be driven by love and compassion, and that we are all more alike as humans than we are different.Humanity in Healthcare. Alexandra shares a personal anecdote about how healthcare is sometimes rigid and callous to the very patients it’s supposed to serve. Healthcare should be guided by kindness, support, and most importantly, love. (12:49)Don’t Get Comfortable. Making assumptions is risky. Especially with COVID-19, much of healthcare is in uncharted territory. If you feel confident that you have all the right answers, be afraid because that bubble might pop. (19:57)Life on the Edge. Part of being an entrepreneur is experiencing the constant whiplash between success and failure. There will always be ups and downs, so make sure to have a support system for the downs. At the same time, not everyone needs to be an entrepreneur, and that’s okay. (24:46)This episode is hosted by Marcus Osborne. He is a member of the Advisory Council for Day Zero and is the Senior Vice President for Walmart Health.Relevant Links:Read more about ArchangelsListen to her TEDMED talk: “What five questions can save your Life or end it?”“Supporting unpaid caregivers in crisis: A talk with Alexandra Drane” by McKinsey & CompanyFollow Alexandra on Twitter  
November 23, 2021
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3: Meet the Hosts: Marcus Osborne, Senior Vice President, Walmart Health

In this episode, we get to know Day Zero Advisory Council member Marcus Osborne. Marcus Osborne serves as Senior Vice President, Walmart Health, where he is focused on furthering Walmart’s goal of providing quality healthcare that is affordable and accessible.
November 19, 2021
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2: Removing the Opacity in Healthcare with Chris Severn, CEO and Co-founder, Turquoise Health

Meet Chris Severn:Chris Severn is the CEO and co-founder of Turquoise Health, which is an online platform that facilitates healthcare price transparency for patients, providers, and payers. Chris previously founded the organizations Acosta and Improv Bridge. His experience with hospital revenue cycles began as a consultant for Triage Consulting Group. Chris has a degree in Business Administration and Management from UC Berkeley.Key Insights:Turquoise Health will hit its one year mark this December. Chris shares his advice for early-stage startup founders and insights into price transparency.Staying True to their Vision. Chris and his co-founder found that some investors wanted to utilize their product to maintain the status quo of healthcare price opacity. They stuck to their mission of transparency, and were able to find the right investors and clients that shared their vision. (13:43)Take Care of Yourself.Chris shares that he recently took a vacation. Startup founders often don’t let themselves take breaks, but Chris knows he performs best when balanced. The pandemic put in perspective that Turquoise is important to him, but other aspects of life are important too. (26:04)Go All In! For a long time, Chris tried to “dip his toe in the water” in starting Turquoise, without fully committing. He shares that Turquoise really took off once he went all in. (28:15)Relevant Links:Check out Turquoise HealthFollow Chris Severn on Twitter“Chris Severn, Turquoise Health, on Bringing Price Transparency to Healthcare” by The Pulse by Wharton Digital Health“Tech Firm Opens Price Transparency Platform to Researchers For Free” by Health Leaders Media
November 16, 2021
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1: Meet the Hosts: Julie Yoo, General Partner, Andreessen Horowitz

In this episode, we get to know Day Zero advisory council member Julie Yoo. Julie serves as General Partner at Andreessen Horowitz where she leads investments in healthcare technology, with a focus on companies that are modernizing how we access, pay for, and experience the healthcare system.
November 12, 2021
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Day Zero Trailer

Day Zero is a podcast where founders share their unique journey. Behind every company is an individual or group of individuals with ambition, goals, and dreams. On Day Zero, you’ll hear the engaging voices of these founders as they tell their story, from their perspective, and in their words.
November 5, 2021
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About Day Zero

Day Zero is a podcast where founders share their unique journeys. Behind every company is an individual or group of individuals with ambition, goals, and dreams. On Day Zero, you’ll hear the engaging voices of these founders as they tell their stories, from their perspectives, and in their words.

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