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101: Breast Cancer Survivor Vatesha Bouler

Uninvisible Pod

101: Breast Cancer Survivor Vatesha Bouler

An educator for over 20 years, Vatesha Bouler is a kindergarten teacher and (almost!) six-year breast cancer survivor. Diagnosed at a relatively young age, her experience pushed her to believe…
November 11, 2020
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EHRGo-THE FUTURE OF HEALTHCARE EDUCATION

101: Breast Cancer Survivor Vatesha Bouler

An educator for over 20 years, Vatesha Bouler is a kindergarten teacher and (almost!) six-year breast cancer survivor. Diagnosed at a relatively young age, her experience pushed her to believe that life must be lived to the fullest — and she walks that walk every day in her advocacy work for others enduring similar experiences. A public speaker and author, she is one of the writers of Beyond Her Reflection, wherein she shares her healthcare story. A woman of faith, she also serves on the Cancer Support Ministry at her church, and has found continued love and support not only in her religious community, but also among friends and family who rallied to assist her in her healing. She recently launched the podcast Tesha’s Tea Room, where she interviews prominent survivors and practitioners in the breast cancer community about life during and after diagnosis.

Tune in as Vatesha shares:

  • that she was diagnosed with stage 2B breast cancer at 36
  • that she was referred to a fertility clinic to freeze her eggs before treatment started
  • that she had a lumpectomy because she was negative for the BRCA gene; additionally, she endured chemo and radiation
  • that the most devastating result of her chemo was the loss of her hair
  • that her 6th anniversary is on 11/29 this year
  • how strong she feels having defeated cancer
  • that she will be living with the fear or recurrence for the rest of her life
  • how she’s organized her present and future lifestyle around ongoing prevention
  • the importance of mental health support for life-changing diagnosis and treatment
  • why her health isn’t hers alone — it belongs to a community
  • the importance of Black female voices in breast cancer care
  • why it’s vital we know our family health history
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