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009: Rachel Trobman, Founder of Pain Management App Ouchie & Survivor of Mixed Connective Tissue Disease

Uninvisible Pod

009: Rachel Trobman, Founder of Pain Management App Ouchie & Survivor of Mixed Connective Tissue Disease

Lauren sits down with Rachel Trobman, founder and CEO of Upside Health, creators of the pain management app Ouchie. Not only is Rachel a busy working mom of 2, but…
February 13, 2019

009: Rachel Trobman, Founder of Pain Management App Ouchie & Survivor of Mixed Connective Tissue Disease

Lauren sits down with Rachel Trobman, founder and CEO of Upside Health, creators of the pain management app Ouchie. Not only is Rachel a busy working mom of 2, but she also lives with mixed connective tissue disease. She gives us a glimpse into her life running a fast-growth business and helming a family on limited bandwidth, and explains the birth of her heart-centered mission to help others reimagine chronic pain care. Not only is Rachel a survivor of invisible chronic illness, but her mother and step-brother are, as well (Lupus SLE and cystic fibrosis). This powerhouse former TV news producer is no stranger to pushing herself to the limit, and she’s doing it with true purpose in a bid to make the world a better – and more compassionate – place.

In this episode, Rachel reveals… 

– how her personal experience and family history of chronic illness led her to develop Ouchie, a mobile companion for pain management 

– the symptoms and treatment of mixed connective tissue disease 

– how a lack of understanding of rheumatological and autoimmune conditions in the medical community can lead to a lack of proper care (in many cases) 

– that you’re stronger than you think you are, and sometimes we limit ourselves because of fear 

– that pregnancy didn’t worsen her symptoms, but in fact improved them – and she had to go to the doctor once a week to keep tabs on her condition 

– why patients on Plaquenil need to have regular retinal screenings 

– that the way in which chronically ill patients are monitored (with regard to minor risks and symptoms, often annually) can build frustration, because these patients are asked to live for long periods of time in relative uncertainty 

– that she’s never been envious or resentful of loved ones for being well; but she can sometimes harbor some irritation toward those in the wide world who take no notice of how lucky they are to be well 

– what she believes all people with chronic illness should embrace more: “what you’re able to accomplish is enough, and nobody else is judging it other than you” 

– that she has faced more discrimination as a mother than she has as a patient of chronic illness 

– that her goal with Ouchie is to educate, advocate, and EMPOWER users, and ultimately to facilitate better patient-clinician relationships and assist patients in navigating complex healthcare systems – to ensure that no one hurts alone 

– that ultimately, working on Ouchie has made her HOPEFUL for the future of medical science and pain management 

– that Ouchie grew out of examples she saw growing up of loved ones who lived with chronic conditions but were not controlled by them 

– that Ouchie uses evidence-backed research in order not to ignore the fact that patients will have bad days, but to help them move through those rough patches with a team behind them 

– that setting small goals can give you something to work toward and be proud of as you work on healing

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