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Modern Digital Infrastructure: What’s Happening to Drive Multiple Clouds for Health Systems?

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Modern Digital Infrastructure: What’s Happening to Drive Multiple Clouds for Health Systems?

October 6, 2022

Modern Digital Infrastructure: What’s Happening to Drive Multiple Clouds for Health Systems?

We used to talk about the fact that healthcare was reticent to move to the cloud because of security and compliance and any other number of reasons. What has changed to drive this increased level of adoption of the cloud? Aging legacy infrastructure and existing data centers led to very high costs. Remote working locations are also a threat. The pressure to be able to share data as a result of the pandemic, while at risk of potential fines, has accelerated that as well. Along with ‘The Great Resignation’ and different adaptations within the cloud infrastructure, we’re seeing challenges around being able to hire the correct professionals to keep the environment to the level that you are accustomed to, but also being able to have the ability to manage all these different platforms to go where you’d really like them to go. Why multi-cloud? What’s happening to drive multiple clouds for health systems? How can we ensure that there’s going to be a certain level of continuity? How can the infrastructure be modernized? Where do the old applications fit in with machine learning and AI and data services? How can all of this be managed and operated efficiently? What about automation?

Sign up for our webinar: Delivering Better Patient Experience with Modern Digital Infrastructure – Thursday October 13 2022: 1pm ET / 10am PT.

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