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Nurses are struggling in isolation

The Podcast by KevinMD

Nurses are struggling in isolation

"It’s apparent to most that the dark clouds and stormy waters in the business of health care continue. There is much that needs attention from both health care workers and…
June 10, 2022

Nurses are struggling in isolation

“It’s apparent to most that the dark clouds and stormy waters in the business of health care continue. There is much that needs attention from both health care workers and consumers.

We have learned that when we work together, strength, creativity, and energy multiply exponentially.

We need to move forward and create a sustainable and caring health care system. We can accomplish this by joining together and acknowledging our struggles, sharing and learning from them.

The next step is key to change — we must take those narratives of drowning and shift their energy in a positive direction. We need to help each other start swimming toward a vision for the future of healing.

Just think about it; what are the possibilities? No dream is too big or too small. Put it out there. You may be surprised at what sticks. And who knows better than you, the working nurse?”

Beth Quaas is a nurse practitioner.

She shares her story and discusses the KevinMD article, “A tale of 2 nurses.”

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