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Episode 7: Discussing Physician Burnout with Dr. Dominic Corrigan of Physician’s Anonymous

The Most Important Medicine: Responding to Trauma and Creating Resilience in Primary Care

Episode 7: Discussing Physician Burnout with Dr. Dominic Corrigan of Physician’s Anonymous

September 7, 2022

Episode 7: Discussing Physician Burnout with Dr. Dominic Corrigan of Physician’s Anonymous

In this podcast, Dr. Amy sits down with Dr. Dominic Corrigan, a psychiatrist with a very personal story to share.  Physician burnout and physician suicide is a relatively unknown issue in the world of medicine.  This stems from many factors, including stigma and a general unwillingness to talk about the subject.

Dr. Amy and Dr. Corrigan explore preconceived notions about physicians and with a candid and heartfelt conversation about the personal journey that Dr. Corrigan himself took, leading up to the culmination of him creating Physiciansanonymous.org.  The website takes aim at providing resources for physicians and providers to have someone to reach out, for whatever the reason.  This may be after a horrible ER shift where they witnessed a child’s death, or the culmination of years of absorbing patient’s problems with no outlet for their own.

This episode will ring true for almost anyone who works in healthcare.  May want to grab tissues and find someone to talk with after this one.

RESOURCES
Physicians Anonymous
Dr. Amy’s Provider Newsletter
Provider Lounge Membership

FREE DOWNLOADS
Provider Lounge Virtual Meeting Freebie
Start Creating Boundaries Handout & Script
Guide To Creating Cultures of Trust At Work

Don’t Forget! Follow Dr. Amy on LinkedIn, Facebook, and Instagram

For more information visit www.doctoramyllc.com 

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