Subscribe
High performance habits with Olympic hopeful and M.D/M.B.A student, Kamali Thompson

The EntreMD Podcast

High performance habits with Olympic hopeful and M.D/M.B.A student, Kamali Thompson

February 24, 2020
ADVERTISEMENT
EHRGo-THE FUTURE OF HEALTHCARE EDUCATION

High performance habits with Olympic hopeful and M.D/M.B.A student, Kamali Thompson

Welcome to another episode of the EntreMD Podcast!

Today, we have Kamali Thompson, a 4th year M.D/M.B.A student at Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School in New Jersey and is currently training for the 2020 U.S Olympics fencing team.

in this episode we discuss:

  • Her journey to professional fencing and medicine.
  • The habits that have made her successful.
  • Her work out routine.
  • How she developed the mental toughness needed to be a high performance athlete.
  • The value of coaching.

Don’t forget to share this episode of the EntreMD podcast on your social media channels and tag us #EntreMD. 

Subscribe & Review in iTunes

Have you subscribed to my podcast? If you haven’t, I want to encourage you to do that today. I don’t want you to miss an episode. Great episodes will be coming every week and if you are not subscribed, there’s a good chance you’ll miss out on those.

Click here to subscribe in iTunes!

Also, I would really love it if you left me a review over on iTunes, too. Your glowing reviews help other people find my podcast and I love reading them. Just click here to review, select “Ratings and Reviews” and “Write a Review” and let me know what your favorite part of the podcast is. Thank you.

Join the EntreMD Private Facebook group here. 

Links mentioned in this episode:

EntreMD Live 06/13/20 in Atlanta, GA.
Give to support Kamali Thompson’s Olympic journey.

ADVERTISEMENT
EHRGo-THE FUTURE OF HEALTHCARE EDUCATION

You may also like

Top Health Podcasts. Delivered to Your Inbox and Eardrums.

Proudly supported by:

cover
Caring for Patients with Cultural Humility: Monica Gandhi, MD, MPH, San Francisco Co-Chair, AIDS Conference 2020 Physicians treating patients from marginalized communities must practice cultural humility.