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Mayo Clinic Q&A: “Brain Fog” is a Lingering Condition for Many COVID-19 Long-Haulers

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Mayo Clinic Q&A: “Brain Fog” is a Lingering Condition for Many COVID-19 Long-Haulers

This episode is shared from Mayo Clinic Q&A and was recorded in March, 2021.  Guest:  Billie A. Schultz, M.D.  Host: Halena M. Gazelka, M.D. (@hmgazelkamd)  Fatigue and what's being called…
March 17, 2021

Mayo Clinic Q&A: “Brain Fog” is a Lingering Condition for Many COVID-19 Long-Haulers

This episode is shared from Mayo Clinic Q&A and was recorded in March, 2021. 

Guest:  Billie A. Schultz, M.D. 

Host: Halena M. Gazelka, M.D. (@hmgazelkamd

Fatigue and what’s being called “brain fog” are turning out to be some of the most common issues for long-hauler patients recovering from COVID-19. The National Institutes of Health calls these and other symptoms, which can last for several months, post-acute sequelae of SARS-CoV-2, or PASC.

Those suffering from brain fog may experience short-term memory loss, confusion, difficulty concentrating, or just feeling different than they did before they had COVID-19, even if it was a mild case of the infection. 

And Dr. Billie Schultz, a Mayo Clinic physical medicine and rehabilitation expert, says, though older patients more often to have these symptoms more often, younger people are also showing up with brain fog.

In this Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Schultz says brain fog seems to be more inflammatory than infection, but there are more questions than answers about this neurological concern. Meanwhile, efforts are underway to develop rehabilitation programs to help patients recover.

AskMayoExpert COVID-19 Resources: https://askmayoexpert.mayoclinic.org/navigator/COVID-19

Connect with the Mayo Clinic’s School of Continuous Professional Development online at https://ce.mayo.edu/ or on Twitter @MayoMedEd.

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