Newsletter
Peer Support to Improve Medicare Advantage Outcomes

Bright Spots in Healthcare

Peer Support to Improve Medicare Advantage Outcomes

Motivating Medicare Advantage members to take the clinical actions needed to promote and support their care is a high priority for health plans. Data shows that talking to peers with…
November 18, 2022

Peer Support to Improve Medicare Advantage Outcomes

Motivating Medicare Advantage members to take the clinical actions needed to promote and support their care is a high priority for health plans. Data shows that talking to peers with whom they can relate and share common health issues benefits members and engages them more in their health

 

Our panel of experts from Humana, Regence, SCAN Health Plan and Wisdo discuss how incorporating peer support programs in your MA plans can improve clinical outcomes, lower costs and boost engagement for members with chronic diseases, behavioral health issues and other social determinants of health. Hear “bright spots” and practical strategies you can implement in your health plan.

 

Panelists: Mike Franz, MD, Senior Medical Director of Behavioral Health, Regence; Lisbeth Briones-Roberts, Chief Togetherness Officer, SCAN Health Plan; Jennifer Spear, Associate Director, Population Health, Humana; Boaz Goan, Founder & CEO, Wisdo Health.

 

This episode is sponsored by Wisdo

Wisdo is a peer support and clinical referral platform designed to address the harmful consequences of loneliness, social isolation, and lack of engagement on health and medical costs. 

Founded in 2018, over 500,000 adults ages  18-80 have joined Wisdo, making it one of the market’s largest and most diverse peer support platforms. Wisdo clients include health plans, gov’t agencies, behavioral health providers, and SDOH services. https://www.wisdo.com/

You may also like

Top Health Podcasts. Delivered to Your Inbox and Eardrums.

Join Our Newsletter

Proudly supported by:

cover
How is Parkinson’s Disease Diagnosed? And How Is a Care Team Created? Parkinson’s disease can’t be diagnosed through a simple blood test or scan. After a referral from a primary care doctor, it often takes visits to a neurologist or movement disorder specialist before receiving a clinical diagnosis.