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How Dementia Care Integrates Formal and Informal Care Services

A Health Podyssey

How Dementia Care Integrates Formal and Informal Care Services

Health Affairs Editor-in-Chief Alan Weil interviews HwaJung Choi from the University of Michigan on family care availability and implications for informal and formal care used by American adults with dementia.
September 28, 2021

How Dementia Care Integrates Formal and Informal Care Services

Roughly 6 million adults ages 65 and older in the United States have dementia. That number is projected to more than double by 2050.

Family caregivers play an essential role in caring for people with dementia, including help with dressing to eating assistance and more.

In 2020, it’s estimated that more than 11 million family members and other unpaid caregivers provided care to people with dementia. But what about those who don’t have family members who can provide this needed care?

HwaJung Choi, a research assistant professor from the University of Michigan, joins A Health Podyssey to talk about the availability of family members to provide care to adults with dementia.

Choi and colleagues published a paper in the September 2021 issue of Health Affairs which found that 18% of dementia patients received care from their spouse and 27% received it from an adult child.

The authors also identified racial disparities in caregiver availability, and much more.

Listen to Health Affairs Editor-in-Chief Alan Weil interview HwaJung Choi on family care availability and implications for informal and formal care used by American adults with dementia.

If you like this interview, order the September issue of Health Affairs.

Pre-order the October Perinatal Mental Health Theme Issue.

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